Phase II of NAHMS Equine 2015-16 Study to Begin

Phase II of NAHMS Equine 2015-16 Study to Begin

The Equine 2015-16 study is designed to provide information on the nation’s equine population that will serve as a basis for education, service, and research related to equine health and management.

Photo: iStock

The USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has announced that Phase II of the National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) Equine 2015-16 study will resume in May. This is NAHMS’ third national study of the U.S. equine industry.

A stakeholder announcement issued Feb. 23 explained that the second phase of the study was postponed because of last year’s highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreak, which led to the largest response to an animal disease emergency in U.S. history. The response required the USDA to temporarily reassign personnel that had been tasked with collecting data for Phase 2 of the study. These personnel are now available to collect the data.

The Equine 2015-16 study is designed to provide participants, industry members, and animal health officials with information on the nation’s equine population that will serve as a basis for education, service, and research related to equine health and management. The survey is also designed to provide new and valuable information regarding industry trends. For more information on the study, see USDA to Begin Equine Study This Spring

To collect the data for the study, representatives from the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service will visit equine operations to conduct personal interviews at all participating operations.

The study has seven objectives:

  • Describe trends in equine care and health management for study years;
  • Estimate the occurrence of owner-reported lameness and describe lameness management practices;
  • Describe health and management practices associated with important equine infectious diseases;
  • Describe health-related costs of equine ownership;
  • Evaluate gastrointestinal parasite control practices;
  • Evaluate equids for the presence of ticks, and describe tick-control practices used on equine operations; and
  • Collect equine blood sera along with demographic information to create a serum bank for future studies.

The announcement said data collection for operations that agreed to participate in Phase 2 will begin in May and continue through September 30. Representatives from USDA’s Veterinary Services will administer the Phase 2 questionnaire, perform a facility biosecurity assessment, collect equine blood and fecal samples, perform a tick exam of equine on the operation, and collect tick specimens, the announcement said. To detect anthelmintic resistance in their equine, operations participating in Phase 2 have the option of collecting fecal samples to be tested for internal parasites, if the operations did not have the same testing done during Phase 1.

About the Author

Erica Larson, News Editor

Erica Larson, news editor, holds a degree in journalism with an external specialty in equine science from Michigan State University in East Lansing. A Massachusetts native, she grew up in the saddle and has dabbled in a variety of disciplines including foxhunting, saddle seat, and mounted games. Currently, Erica competes in three-day eventing with her OTTB, Dorado.

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