Surgery Scheduled Sunday Afternoon for Barbaro

Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro, who suffered multiple fractures soon after the start of the Preakness Stakes (gr. I), has been taken to the George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals at the New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, Pa. He is scheduled to undergo surgery Sunday afternoon.

description
JEFFREY SNYDER 

Jockey Edgar Prado and unidentified man attempt to calm Barbaro after the Kentucky Derby winner was pulled up shortly after the start of the Preakness.

His injury is career-ending and life-threatening.

The transport from Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore to Pennsylvania was shown live on WBAL-TV.

The Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (gr. I) winner stumbled and dropped behind the nine-horse Preakness field before being pulled up by jockey Edgar Prado in front of the clubhouse. Barbaro had broken through the gate before the race officially started.

According to Dr. Larry Bramlage, a prominent equine surgeon with the American Association of Equine Practitioners, Barbaro suffered a condylar fracture of the cannon bone in his right hind leg above the ankle. Below the ankle is a comminuted fracture (meaning it is in pieces) of the first phalanx (long pastern bone) and there is a piece off the sesamoid.

At New Bolton, Dr. Dean Richardson will be in charge, according to Bramlage.

Bramlage added that a major factor in the prognosis will be how much the colt's blood supply has been compromised by the injury.

"When he went to the gate, he was feeling super and I felt like he was in the best condition for this race," Prado said. "He actually tried to buck me off a couple of times. He was feeling that good. He just touched the front of the doors of the gate and went right through it.

"During the race, he took a bad step and I can't really tell you what happened. I heard a noise about 100 yards into the race and pulled him right up."

Gretchen Jackson, who bred and campaigned the colt with her husband Roy Jackson under the Lael Stables banner, said she was still in shock.

"We didn't expect this. You can expect being beaten," she said. "It looked like a bad fracture. We're hoping that they'll operate on him tomorrow. That's as much as we know."

About the Author

Multiple Authors

Stay on top of the most recent Horse Health news with FREE weekly newsletters from TheHorse.com. Learn More

Free Newsletters

Sign up for the latest in:

From our partners