Stall Flooring

You give a lot of thought to your horse's health and happiness. You groom him until he gleams, swaddle him in boots and blankets, carefully monitor his diet, and expend considerable effort and expense making sure he's comfortably bedded. But have you thought about what lies beneath that soft bed? In essence, the stall floor is the box spring beneath your horse's mattress, and it's every bit as important as what goes on top--perhaps more so.

No matter how nice the bedding, a poorly constructed floor can lead to respiratory troubles from ammonia gases, thrush from trapped moisture, achy joints from uneven or too-hard surfaces, and injury from slippery or abrasive materials. In addition, a poor floor can mean wasted bedding and extra labor for you.

A good stall floor starts with a good construction plan. John Blackburn, senior principal of Blackburn Architects, an 18-year-old firm that has designed more than 100 barns in 26 states; and Peter Gibbs, Extension Horse Specialist at Texas A&M University, outline the steps involved in building a floor that will keep you and your horse happy, whether you're revamping an existing stall or building a brand new barn from scratch.

Starting From Scratch

1. Pick the location. If you're building a barn, you have the luxury of choosing the best site. Look for an area that's dry or at least easy to drain. Avoid steep slopes, areas that are consistently wet, and locations that are subject to water runoff during heavy rains or snow melt. In terms of soil, you're basically stuck with whatever is normal for your region. But if you have it, soil that packs tightly is ideal, says Blackburn, because it will provide a tough surface that isn't too hard or abrasive.

2. Dig to the base. Whether you're starting from scratch or redoing an existing stall, you need to dig down to a well-draining layer of soil. This will give urine and other moisture a path to drain away from your horse. Expect to excavate at least one foot deep over the entire stall, says Blackburn. You might have to go deeper, depending on local soil conditions.

3. Level the ground. You should level out that base layer to help make sure the surfaces above it are level. A nice, even plane puts less stress on your horse's legs than an uneven floor.

4. Compact the base and fill. Even if the floor starts out flat, Gibbs explains that extended use can create a holey or uneven surface, especially with dirt or stone-dust flooring. To form a firm foundation that can withstand daily wear and tear for extended periods, compact the floor. You can use a hand roller, a motorized, hand-held compactor or "settler," or some other heavy pounding tool to do the job.

First, compact the layer you've uncovered and leveled. Then begin adding layers of dirt or stone dust. "The important thing is to install the flooring in layers and tamp it at each layer," says Blackburn. He recommends using three-inch layers for dirt or one- to two-inch layers for stone dust. Compact each layer "until you think it can take the abuse of hooves kicking at it," he adds, noting that there isn't a standard measure to go by.

To ensure good drainage away from the building, add layers until your floor's surface is 12 to 18 inches above the natural grade around the barn, says Blackburn. "You want to get the moisture to drain through the flooring and away from the stall and barn," he explains. In addition, this protects the floor from high water levels outside that might otherwise easily flood the stall.

Now you're ready to add the floor itself. Next you'll find basic installation information for several common types of flooring.

Adding the Flooring

Dirt--If you plan to have a dirt floor, and local soil drains exceptionally well, you're done. Most soils, however, drain moderately well at best, so you'll probably want to help it along. One option is to grade the top layer of dirt slightly (no more than three degrees), so that moisture runs off to exit the barn through an outlet in the corner.

You could also make a "leach hole," or simple drain, inside the stall. To do this, dig a hole about three feet in diameter and deep enough to reach that bottom, well-draining layer of soil at the base you created. Then fill the hole with varying sizes of rock (or alternating layers of sand and gravel), starting with large gravel chunks at the bottom and working toward stone dust at the top. Tamp into place and cover with dirt to even out the floor.

Stone Dust--Blackburn believes that stone dust (also known as crusher run, screenings, or quarter-inch minus) makes a better floor than dirt, "because it can compact well and still permits drainage." However, he does recommend adding a subsurface drainage system to enhance flow-through. To do this, lay filter fabric over the floor, top it with a layer of crushed gravel, then add three to five inches of stone dust. As you did with the base, compact the stone dust after each one- to two-inch layer. When you're done, water the floor, tamp it down tight again, and let it settle overnight. Fill in any holes or depressions the next day.

Another idea is to install a drainpipe under the stone dust floor. "I feel that this helps drain the moisture away from the stall area and allows you to flush the stall with moisture to cleanse the flooring," explains Blackburn. "Otherwise, it could drain into the dirt and stone and stay there, providing odor and a breeding ground for bacteria."

To lay pipe, first dig a swale--a sloped ditch about one foot deep. Lay perforated pipe into the swale (you want a piece long enough to provide drainage away from the building, notes Blackburn). Cover the pipe with filter fabric, then fill the swale with crushed gravel. Now add and compact your stone dust as stated previously.

Plastic Grid--Plastic grid flooring comes in many variations, but the basic idea is the same for all floors: To provide a 100% permeable floor plus a level, stable, durable surface. Installation instructions vary by manufacturer; however, most recommend laying the grid over a well-draining subsurface (such as stone dust) so that moisture not absorbed by bedding will drain away. Usually, the holes in the grid (which create the excellent drainage) are filled with stone dust.

Rubber Mats--As with grid systems, rubber mats (and similarly, rubber pavers, which look like rubber bricks) vary in design, thickness, texture, etc., from one manufacturer to the next. Likewise for installation instructions, although most want you to measure stalls so that mats fit snugly against each other and the walls. Unlike grids, however, mats and pavers are meant to trap moisture above the surface, where it can be absorbed by bedding. Moisture can seep through the seams (or possibly the rubber itself), though. So, flooring experts recommend that you lay mats over a well-draining subsurface, such as one of the crushed stone systems mentioned earlier, or over relatively nonporous materials such as concrete and asphalt that can be easily disinfected.

Asphalt--You can lay an asphalt floor yourself, if you're willing to find a supplier, rent equipment, and learn the proper way to apply, rake, and settle it. However, it can be a tricky process. As Blackburn notes, "The right mix of asphalt is important. It should be raked as it's installed, then hand rolled. I would imagine that hiring a professional would be advisable."

He also suggests that you grade asphalt floors with a crown of one-eighth inch per foot in order to sustain drainage. "With a flat surface, the urine puddles and leaves the horse standing in dampness, potentially causing all kinds of hoof issues," he explains. The slope will also facilitate drainage when the stall is washed or disinfected. Blackburn recommends the use of aggregate, or "popcorn," asphalt, which offers a non-slip texture. And he strongly urges the use of rubber mats or rubber pavers to cushion this relatively unforgiving surface.

Concrete--Many people are comfortable mixing and pouring their own concrete--an easier process than laying asphalt. For larger projects, you might want to hire outside assistance. Although moisture can seep through concrete over time, this footing is not as porous as stone dust. So, Blackburn recommends grading it at a rate of one-eight inch to one-quarter inch per foot to allow for drainage. Concrete should be cushioned with rubber mats or pavers, he adds, to reduce the risk of injury and musculoskeletal stresses that this hard flooring could cause.

A Note on Cost

Before you begin stall floor construction, you should create a budget for the project. However, as Blackburn notes, "The cost of different options can vary dramatically based on the number of stalls, location, and the material used," as well as the specific suppliers, consultants, and equipment rental agencies with which you might deal.

For instance, says Blackburn, "I have found that the cost of asphalt flooring can range widely from area to area. And some suppliers require that a large quantity be ordered of the type and mix you need before they will supply it at a reasonable price." Therefore, it could actually be more expensive, per stall, to floor a smaller barn than a larger barn. It's important to contact local companies for estimates before you start the job. (For mass-manufactured, nationally distributed products like most rubber mats and plastic grid systems, you can check pricing with the manufacturers, many of whom have web sites.)

As you start compiling price quotes and creating a budget, Blackburn cautions that you consider not just the initial expense of purchase and installation, but also long-term costs. A dirt floor might be virtually free to install except for labor, but could be expensive in terms of labor over the long run. Rubber mats might be pricey at the start, but could pay for themselves through longevity, ease of care, and reduced bedding.


Briggs, K. Come On Down. The Horse, January 2001, 83-87.

Briggs, K. Home Sweet Home. The Horse, May 1999, 107-110.

Briggs, K. Housing Your Horse. The Horse, September 1998, 18-33.

Briggs, K. Secrets of Rubber Mats. The Horse, June 2000, 109-116.

Briggs, K. Stall Design. The Horse, November 1999, 103-113.

Strickland, C. From the Ground Up. The Horse, July 1998, 89-93.

About the Author

Sushil Dulai Wenholz

Sushil Dulai Wenholz is a free-lance writer based in Lakewood, Colo. Her work appears in a number of leading equine publications, and she has earned awards from the American Horse Publications and the Western Fairs Association.

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