Pain Management

Article

Kentucky Issues Advisory on Naproxen Use

April 20, 2006

The Kentucky Equine Drug Research Council has recommended horsemen discontinue the use of naproxen at least five days before a horse is scheduled to run to avoid facing a penalty if the horse tests positive for the drug on race... Read More

Article

Broken Legs Aren't Death

January 01, 2006

Looking at a horse's delicate limbs, it's a wonder that those bones can put up with any sort of pressure at all. Equine bones are very tough, but fractures still happen. When they do, even the most stoic of horse owners can feel desperate. But a... Read More

Article

Chronic Joint Diseases (Book Excerpt)

December 14, 2005

Horses with chronic musculoskeletal disorders may benefit from periodic administration of analgesic medications such as NSAIDs to help control pain when it is at its worst.... Read More

Article

Electroacupuncture Alleviates Chronic Back Pain

November 01, 2005

University of Florida (UF) researchers have reported success with using electroacupuncture to alleviate chronic back pain in horses. The study was published in a recent edition of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.... Read More

Article

Shock Wave Therapy for Pain Relief and Healing

November 01, 2005

In a recently completed study involving navicular cases, Byron found lameness in horses undergoing extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) treatment averaged improvement of about one lameness grade. ... Read More

Article

Dreams Can Come True

October 01, 2005

Soñador is Spanish for "dreamer," the title of a movie opening this month that sounds like a natural fit for horse lovers. According to information from DreamWorks, Dreamer's writer/producer John Gatins grew up loving racehorses, and wondering... Read More

Article

No Added Benefits from Higher Bute Dosage

June 01, 2005

Higher dosages of phenylbutazone (Bute) don't make chronically lame horses any sounder than standard doses, according to a study in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. Thus, giving a lame horse... Read More

Article

Arthritis in the Performance Horse

May 31, 2005

Arthritis causes considerable pain in your horse, and understanding the disease cycle is necessary in order to prevent further damage from occurring. "One-third of all lameness is due to arthritis or soft tissue trauma," said Rhonda Rathgeber,... Read More

Article

Stem Cell Treatments Successful on Tendon Injuries

May 16, 2005

Mr Cool's victory in the Stanleybet Long Distance Handicap Hurdle at Haydock Park Racecourse, England, on Saturday, May 7 was noteworthy due to pioneering tendon treatment he had received.

After the 11-year-old suffered a tendon injury i... Read More

Article

Athletic Taping of the Lower Limb

May 01, 2005

Athletic taping is commonly used in human sports medicine to begin a physical therapy program; it stabilizes injured soft tissues and helps prevent further injury. Years of experience in the use of athletic taping as well as scientific research... Read More

Article

Assess Heel Lacerations Early for Best Recovery

April 26, 2005

"A simple heel bulb laceration may look like a regular 'nothing' cut, but it could be life-threatening if it's in the coffin joint, so you need to get it evaluated right away," said Robin M. Dabareiner, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVS, while describing a... Read More

Article

COX-2 Selective Drugs Considered Safe for Horses

February 14, 2005

Following the release of human clinical trial data demonstrating the link between pain-relieving medications known as COX-2 inhibitors and an increased risk of heart attack and stroke, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently issued a... Read More

Article

Sacroiliac Joint Pain

February 13, 2005

There were a couple of take-home messages from Dyson's presentation. One was that sacroiliac joint problems can dramatically compromise a horse's ability to perform, and the other was that using an analgesic injection can be a valuable technique in ... Read More

Article

BEVA Shares Education

February 01, 2005

The United Kingdom is famous for its rich history and deeply rooted traditions, but that doesn't mean its veterinarians are bound to ancient methods of equine medicine. Quite the contrary, the British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) hosts... Read More

Article

USEF Permits Use of Surpass

January 01, 2005

Effective Dec. 1, 2004, the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) Equine Drugs and Medications Rule permitted the therapeutic use of Surpass, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory product (NSAID) recently approved by the Food and Drug... Read More

Article

Bute, Colitis, and Ulcers

January 01, 2005

The equine esophagus extends into the first one-third of the stomach, making horses susceptible to acid reflux disease. Naturally present bacteria can colonize in ulcers, and the stomach acid can keep them from healing.... Read More

Article

NC State Veterinary Researchers Discover New Adverse Effects Associated With Systemic NSAID Use in Horses

November 24, 2004

RALEIGH, N.C., November 19, 2004—Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of treatment for many painful conditions in horses, including arthritis, laminitis, and colic.  Although these drugs are an important... Read More

Article

Managing Skeletal Pain

October 21, 2004

"Management of severe skeletal pain in the horse can be a challenging task in practice, and is complicated by the fact that many drugs used for this purpose are controlled substances," said Jessica Kidd, BA, DVM, CertES(Orth), DipECVS, MRCVS, of... Read More

Article

Warm Springwater Immersion

October 01, 2004

Immersion of the body in natural springwater has been studied extensively in humans and dogs for its healing effects. The theory behind immersion is its ability to temporarily suppress the sympathetic nervous system (SNS, the part of the nervous... Read More

Article

Understanding Equine Pain

October 01, 2004

Would you know if your horse was in pain? "Sure," you think, perhaps picturing your horse with a notable limp or a gaping wound. But what about less dramatic scenarios? Does it hurt your horse when you pull his mane, give him an injection, or... Read More

Article

Dissolving the Stain of Pain

July 15, 2004

The presence and degree of pain an animal experiences is meant to be beneficial. Pain signals actual or impending body damage, and may help prevent further damage by initiating movement away from the cause or by limiting use of injured areas... Read More

Article

New Topical Osteoarthritis Treatment Available

June 02, 2004

The FDA recently approved a new non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that can be applied to the skin over a horse's joint to relieve pain of osteoarthritis. The approval represents the first topical equine pharmaceutical formulation... Read More

Article

Stall Rest: Laid Up or Losing It?

June 01, 2004

Stall rest--a term that all horse owners and stable managers dread--is generally prescribed following severe injury such as fractures, large wounds, surgery, and in some cases of lameness. How strictly imposed the stall rest is depends upon the sever... Read More

Article

Joint Injections: A Good Idea?

May 01, 2004

Joint injections are a popular treatment used to help sport horses combat problems such as osteoarthritis.... Read More

Article

Banamine Returns to the Market

April 23, 2004

Schering-Plough Animal Health has announced that Banamine Injectable Solution, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drug for horses, is available again to treat inflammation and pain associated with musculoskeletal disorders and colic.... Read More