Recent News for Bone & Joint Problems

Routine hoof care is critical for your horse’s soundness and well-being. “A lot of times, when horses are on pasture, not in performance and not getting ridden very often, hoof problems arise due to longer intervals between care,” Tanner says. Whether a horse is barefoot or shod, “routine trimming by a skilled farrier,” is essential to reduce the possibility of laminitis, he adds.

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Older Horses Part 4: Hoof and Joint Care

October 01, 2007

The aging process brings with it some inevitable changes in horses. ... Read More

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Strength and Flexibility

October 01, 2007


There are a variety of ways to help your horse be stronger and less stiff.

For an avid horse person, little takes the breath away like watching an athletic... Read More

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Horses with Septic Arthritis Can Be Monitored Via Synovial Fluid Analysis

September 15, 2007

Synovial fluid analysis, including evaluation of white blood cell counts and matrix metalloproteinases -2 and -9 (which degrade articular cartilage), can be employed to monitor effect of treatment and predict survival in horses with septic... Read More

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Feeding to Avoid Developmental Orthopedic Disease (DOD)

September 01, 2007

The way you feed young horses could help them develop strong, properly formed bones and joints. ... Read More

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Avocado Soybean Unsaponifiable (ASU) Extracts Earn a Passing Grade for Equine Osteoarthritis

July 30, 2007

Avocado and soybean unsaponifiable (ASU) extracts--the fraction of oil that does not form soap after hydrolysis--are some of the newest joint products to grace the equine nutritional supplement shelves. The beneficial effects of ASU for horses... Read More

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Joint Disease and Lameness

July 23, 2007

More than half of all equine lameness is due to noninfectious joint disease and injury. It can happen from one bad step, but it's most likely due to cyclic (repeated) trauma.... Read More

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Higher Silicate-Associated Osteoporosis Risk in Some Regions

July 19, 2007

Silicosis in horses is a respiratory condition caused by exposure to certain types of silicate dust found in some geographic regions. While silicosis is not a commonly diagnosed equine ailment in most areas of the country, Matthew Durham, DVM... Read More

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All Stocked Up

July 01, 2007

It happened again: Your horse was fine for the entire weekend of riding, but when you got him ready for another weekend packed with activities, you discovered his hind limbs were swollen. You know it's not overuse; the boarding barn provides... Read More

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Protecting Equine Athletes from Osteoarthritis

June 28, 2007

Since most horses are used for recreational or performance activities, soundness is understandably of vital importance to horse owners. A 2003 study suggested that 60% of lameness problems in horses are related to osteoarthritis, thus stressing the... Read More

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Hitch in the Giddy-Up

June 01, 2007

Question: I have a Trakehner/Thoroughbred cross that starts flexing his hind legs rather noticeably when trotting and/or beginning to canter. He usually does not do this unless he gets excited in the trot, is striking off in the canter, or is ... Read More

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Treating Stifle Injuries

March 22, 2007

A panel of three veterinarians addressed the topic of stifle treatment at the Western Performance Horse Forum.... Read More

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Finding and Managing Back Injuries and Pain

March 13, 2007

How do you locate the source of back pain in the horse? Once you find the source, how do you manage the pain? At the Western Performance Horse Forum held in Nampa, Idaho, on Feb. 15-17, a panel of three veterinarians discussed options for findin... Read More

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Diagnosis of Back and Sacroiliac Pain

March 10, 2007

Chris Ray, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVS, of Weatherford, Texas struck off the discussion about lameness and performance problems associated with back and sacral area pain at the Western Performance Horse Forum held in Nampa, Idaho, on Feb. 15-17. He... Read More

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Nutrition to Go

March 01, 2007

A group of veterinarians gathered at the Land O' Lakes Purina Mills headquarters in St. Louis, Mo., last fall to participate in discussions on subjects that ranged from Cushing's disease to proper nutrition for horses young and old. Nicholas Frank,... Read More

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Exercise Study Reveals Anatomical Potential for Fetlock Injury

December 05, 2006

Previous studies have shown that bones develop to suit the purpose routinely required of them; therefore, would young horses in regular work from the time they are foals have stronger musculoskeletal tissues then those left to mature in pasture?... Read More

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Bulking Up, Not Adding On

December 03, 2006

Although training might make your yearling look like a bodybuilder, that physique doesn't guarantee athletic prowess. Evolutionary factors--not early speed or exercise programs--determine the amount of fast-twitch muscle horses have as adults.... Read More

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Oral HA Reduces Post-Surgical Hock OCD Swelling

October 28, 2006

Both intra-articular (in the joint) and intravenous (in the vein) injections of hyaluronan (HA) have been proven effective in treating joint diseases, such as osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions, over the years. However, a relative newcomer... Read More

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Corticosteroids: Short- and Long-Term Effects

October 01, 2006

Of the medications available in the arsenal of anti-inflammatory therapies, there is one type that has caused ... Read More

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Angular Limb Deformities in Foals

September 20, 2006

Some of the common bone abnormalities of young foals are referred to as angular limb deformities. Instead of having straight legs, a foal is born with an angle or crook in its legs, similar to a person who is bowlegged. This angular... Read More

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Tendons and Ligaments: Anatomy and Physiology

September 01, 2006

Tendons and ligaments in the horse are the "belts" and "cables" that hold bones in place and allow the muscles to do their jobs in creating propulsion-- forward, backward, sideways, and up and down. Because of the workload often put upon them, tendon... Read More

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Body Builders--Muscles

August 01, 2006

Muscles are one of the most important components in the equine body. Without them, the horse would be unable to walk, chew and digest food, or even swish his tail. Muscles comprise the largest tissue mass in the horse's body. There are various types ... Read More

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Feeding to Prevent and Control Disease

August 01, 2006

Dietary management can work like magic for specific equine diseases.... Read More

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The Equine Back: Conformation and Injuries

July 01, 2006

Even a horse with excellent conformation can wind up with back problems if ridden by a rider out of balance or if outfitted with inappropriate tack.... Read More

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Anatomy and Physiology Part 6: The Head and Neck

June 01, 2006

The equine head can be compared to a computer. Housed within the skull are the major components--the brain and the sense organs. In addition to functioning like a computer, the equine head contains teeth for cropping grass and chewing food, and all... Read More

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The Perfect Engine

April 01, 2006

Much has already been stated in this series about the special concerns involving front limb soundness in the horse since 60-65% of the animal's weight is carried in the front end. This does not mean that there are no concerns involving the... Read More