Recent News for Nutrition Basics

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Colic Surgery and Reperfusion Injury

March 01, 2004

During colic surgery, it can be difficult to judge whether twisted bowel deprived of oxygenated blood, a process called ischemia, will recover sufficiently once it is replaced and blood flows again. While the bowel might look healthy on the outside, ... Read More

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Diseases of Dietary Origin

March 01, 2004

The axiom, "You are what you eat" does have relevance to horses with regard to health and well-being. Although horses have evolved to eat plant material, not all plants are safe to eat. Some food substances directly exert toxic effects, while... Read More

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Dogs and Horses: Predators and Prey

March 01, 2004

There they are: Your two best friends. Fred has been your buddy since you were a teenager, sharing your victories and disappointments, always steadfast and reliable. Bonnie has only been part of your life for a couple of months, but you've hit i... Read More

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The Grass is Not Always Greener

March 01, 2004

The word "horse" conjures up images of graceful, powerful animals roaming across miles of rolling hills, periodically stopping to graze on lush, green grass. In reality, such scenes are rare; these days, many horses live without... Read More

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Nutrient Requirements of the Foot

February 23, 2004

"The hoof is a truly dynamic architecture, and its nutrient supply is critical for its strength and function," said Connie Swenson, PhD, research nutritionist with Zinpro Corporation, at the Second International Equine Conference on Laminitis an... Read More

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Gastrointestinal Rupture Clinical Signs (AAEP 2003)

February 17, 2004

Results of the study could help veterinarians know what signs to look for to make a definitive diagnosis of intestinal rupture, thus allowing them to prevent prolonged suffering of the affected horse and additional expense to the horse owner, as euth... Read More

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Cribbing: Effect on Colic (AAEP 2003)

February 04, 2004

Cribbing, the oral stereotypic behavior in which the horse grabs an object with his teeth while flexing his neck and sometimes swallowing air, has long been suspected as a cause of colic. ... Read More

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Round Pen Injuries

February 01, 2004

Has there has been an increase in hind limb lameness since the round pen has become more popular? I feel like I ruined my dream horse with round pen work starting when he was about six months old. He is nine now and mostly unridable due to a... Read More

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When a Foal Needs Surgery (AAEP 2003)

January 31, 2004

If your new foal develops a disease or medical problem that requires surgery, then time is of the essence. In his AAEP Convention presentation "Surgical Disease of the Neonate," Rolf Embertson, DVM, Dipl. ACVS, of Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital... Read More

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The Equine Stomach (AAEP 2003: Milne Lecture)

January 31, 2004

Merritt's presentation highlighted advances made over the last 40 years in the understanding of how the equine stomach functions and its related diseases. His presentation had a special emphasis on equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS), and slides of ... Read More

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Purina Mills to Host Nation's Largest Horse Owner Educational Event, In Towns Across America

January 09, 2004

Officials for Purina Mills Horse Business Group announced plans to roll out their largest horse event of the year. The Purina Mills Horse Owner’s Workshop will give horse enthusiasts in markets across the country the opportunity to hear about th... Read More

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Glass Horse Model Expanded

January 07, 2004

The popular three-dimensional electronic horse model, "The Glass Horse CD," which offered a novel look at the gastrointestinal anatomy of the horse when it was introduced in November of 2001, has a new companion that depicts the structures of th... Read More

Article

No Grass, No Horse

January 01, 2004

Research published in Nature shows that climate changes and the highly specialized digestive system of the wild horse Equus ferus might have contributed to its extinction in North America.... Read More

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Other Ways of Roughing It

December 01, 2003

For many years there has been a saying among horse owners concerning what to feed equines. It goes something likes this: "Dr. Green is an excellent veterinarian." What is meant by that statement is that green grass prevents a lot of equine healt... Read More

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Cutting Down on Carbs (For Your Horse)

November 17, 2003

In an attempt to avoid the rich diets that can worsen obesity and laminitis in insulin-resistant horses (those said to be suffering from peripheral Cushing's disease), many owners feed hay instead of lush pasture or grain. However, Kathryn Watts... Read More

Article

Folic Acid Supplementation

November 01, 2003

Sulphadiazine and pyrimethamine are used in combination to treat equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). These drugs interfere with folic acid (folate) metabolism, a vitamin essential for survival of the causative protozoon Sarcocystis... Read More

Article

Surviving Colic

November 01, 2003

In decades past, colic treatment was actually a misnomer. "Treatment" consisted of waiting out the colic while offering sedative-like drugs to dampen a horse's misery. Either his body healed of its own accord, or he succumbed to death from... Read More

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Problems for Horse Owners Caused by This Summer's Wet Weather

October 14, 2003

From Penn State University's Dairy & Animal Science News

The wet weather this summer has not only increased the price of quality hay, but creates the right conditions for increased mold, fungi and mycotoxins in hay and... Read More

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Feeding Horses in Group Settings: Managing the Mob

October 01, 2003

When feeding horses at pasture or in large paddocks, it can often be a challenge to make sure each horse gets his share of the feed, while reducing waste and feed contamination. Management is the key to successfully feeding horses in a group setting,... Read More

Article

The Grass Can Be Greener

October 01, 2003

Now is the time to make improvements to your pastures in order to have the best and most nutritious grazing for your horses next spring. A well-maintained pasture also offers a practical and economic break for you, as well. Through pasturing,... Read More

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Forages for Stabled Horses

October 01, 2003

Busy training schedules and fears about injury often limit pasture access for performance horses. Prolonged stall confinement, however, can be detrimental to a horse's attitude. Boredom can lead to destructive behaviors, including weaving,... Read More

Article

Salting Hay for Storage

September 01, 2003

Q: I was told that using rock salt on hay that is kept in a small area would keep it from molding. Is this true, and would it do anything to the hay other than keep it dry?      Julie... Read More

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Blister Beetle Poisoning in Florida

September 01, 2003

At press time, three horses had died of blister beetle poisoning in Clay County, Fla., and two others returned home following treatment at the University of Florida after eating alfalfa hay contaminated with blister beetles. The hay was delivere... Read More

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Deciphering Nutraceutical Labels

August 01, 2003

Did you ever go to the tack store and try to figure out the exact amounts per serving of each ingredient contained in some of the nutraceutical products? It can be an important issue if your horse's joint supplement, vitamin supplement, and food... Read More

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Does Fat Really Impact Digestion of Fiber?

July 01, 2003

Dietary fats are important components of performance horses' diets because they are calorie-dense and energy-rich. Previous studies have shown, however, that diets high in soybean oil interfere with fiber digestion in trotters. It is unclear... Read More