Recent News for Anatomy & Physiology

Article

The Adaptive Equine Stomach

December 01, 2002

A study at the Island Whirl Equine Colic Research Laboratory at the University of Florida has determined that the horse's stomach can adapt to meals of various sizes and compositions, giving researchers a better understanding of how the normal... Read More

Article

Understanding Back Pain

November 01, 2002

Since the beginning of his involvement with man, the horse has been used to either pull heavy loads or carry a rider or packs upon his back. Prior to the advent of the gasoline engine, a great many horses were bred for pulling strength and power... Read More

Article

Hoof Project Foundation Will Fund Lameness Research

November 01, 2002

Combining scientific research with real-life case management is the mission of the new Hoof Project Foundation headed by David Hood, DVM, PhD. Noted for his research on hoof problems such as laminitis, Hood hopes to work with the horse-owning... Read More

Article

The Body's Building Blocks

November 01, 2002

Like a structure made of tinker toys, protein is composed of smaller pieces--the amino acids. These can be rearranged to form the different types of protein-based tissues in the body. Protein is one of the basic nutrient elements of the equine... Read More

Article

Bluegrass Equine Reproduction Symposium: Stallions

October 30, 2002

A four-day seminar focusing on reproduction education for veterinarians was hosted by Hagyard-Davidson-McGee veterinary firm in Lexington, Ky., Oct. 23-26 This is the fifth year for a fall seminar hosted by the group, which now alternates with a... Read More

Article

Carbohydrates for Energy

August 01, 2002

In human nutrition, carbohydrates or "carbs" have a bit of a bad name these days. A quick trip through the local book store or over the Internet leads us to believe that dietary carbohydrates are the source of all evil. When weight loss is the... Read More

Article

New Focus on the Foot

July 01, 2002

No foot, no horse; these words are as true today as they were two hundred years ago. But during that time, the horse has gone from being a "beast of burden" as the major means of transportation to a leisure animal--one that we ride for pleasure... Read More

Article

Are Your Horse's Bones Tough Enough?

July 01, 2002

Skeletal injuries--those involving bones and joints--are a major concern for all athletic horses. The usual outcome of these injuries is a lameness problem that hampers a horse's training and competition program or, in some cases, is so severe... Read More

Article

Tendons and Ligaments

April 01, 2002

It should come as no surprise that horses suffer from tendon and ligament injuries. When one considers these vital parts of the equine anatomy and the stresses placed upon them, it's a tribute to the horse's physical make-up that there aren't... Read More

Article

Dental Correction and Feed Digestibility

March 13, 2002

Equine dental abnormalities are among the top five most common medical problems encountered by equine veterinarians. Clinical evidence has shown that horses with severe tooth hooks and points that were corrected gained weight... Read More

Article

The Equine Immune System

March 01, 2002

Vaccines are designed based on the specific nature of an antibody response to an antigen. In other words, the antibody will work only against the antigen that stimulated its production. A "booster" creates more antibodies, a quicker response, an... Read More

Article

Equine Medicine/Surgery Congress

February 13, 2002

Veterinarians worldwide were attracted to the prominent names in veterinary medicine who presented topics at the seventh Congress on Equine Medicine and Surgery held in Geneva, Switzerland, Dec. 11-13, 2001.

“There were over 500... Read More

Article

Can You Influence Hoof Growth?

February 01, 2002

We ask an awful lot of an animal who walks on his middle toenails. Humans have recognized for centuries that the foundation of a horse's soundness lies in his hooves--"No foot, no horse" is about as basic a principle as there is. It all comes... Read More

Article

Endotoxemia and Gastrointestinal Disease

February 01, 2002

Endotoxemia is one of the most commonly encountered life-threatening conditions in horses with gastrointestinal disease. It is, by nature, a very disappointing and frustrating disease to encounter, and is the leading cause of death in adult horses... Read More

Article

Clostridium perfringens Genome Sequenced

January 24, 2002

Japanese scientists recently announced that they have sequenced the genome of Clostridium perfringens. The organism can cause diarrhea, scours, and other intestinal problems in horses. Clostridia are normally found in various environments... Read More

Article

Equine Digestive Physiology

January 09, 2002

An understanding of the horses' digestive tract, where feedstuffs are digested and how that impacts the end products of digestion, is necessary to help the horse meet these challenges. The digestive tract of the horse is divided into two sections... Read More

Article

"Glass Horse" Unveiled at Veterinary Convention

January 03, 2002

Hundreds of veterinarians waited patiently in line in San Diego, Calif., on the afternoon of Nov. 26—and not at the airport. They were waiting in the American Association of Equine Practitioners convention trade show to purchase a copy of “The... Read More

Article

In the Aftermath of Birth--Retained Placenta

January 01, 2002

The birth of a foal is a wondrous event; if all goes well, it is over quickly as the mare goes through the three stages of labor. The first stage generally involves restlessness as the mare paces the stall, paws, lies down, gets back up, and... Read More

Article

Ovulation

November 01, 2001

There is a rhythm to nature. Season follows season, with each having a specific purpose to serve in the grand scheme of things. There is a time for planting, a time for growing, a time for harvesting, and a time for resting to prepare for the... Read More

Article

The Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract

October 16, 2001

Then there is the matter of the large colon, with its sacculated construction that seems made to order for twisting or strangulating when the pouches become distended by gas during a bout with colic.

There is also the matter of length. If... Read More

Article

LSU Equine Veterinary Research: Young and Growing

October 16, 2001

The Thoroughbred racing and breeding industries in Louisiana were influential in funding and building the veterinary school at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, but the school serves all the state's horses and their owners. Although one... Read More

Article

Persistent Uterine Infections

October 16, 2001

T he question that begs an answer concerning uterine infections, in the mind of Jim Briddle, DVM, Riverton, Wyo., isn't so much why they occur, but, rather, why they don't occur more frequently.

"It has always been amazing to me," says the... Read More

Article

Colostrum: Nothing Better Than Mother's Milk

October 16, 2001

There might be ongoing debate as to the value of a woman's colostrum versus commercial colostrum products, but for a foal, nothing is better than a mare's milk. Colostrum is specialized milk secreted during the first 24 hours following birth and... Read More

Article

Uterine Cysts

October 15, 2001

The equine uterus, in a manner of speaking, could be compared to a house. When a house is snug and solid with no broken windows, holes in the roof, drafts, or plugged drains, it is a comfortable place in which to live. If, however, there are... Read More

Article

The Equine Foot -- Form and Function

October 15, 2001

There is an adage that is as old as the modern-day horse. It goes something like this: No foot, no horse. My late father, who could pick out a minute leg or foot unsoundness at a glance, used to lecture his young son about the importance of good... Read More