Recent News for Anatomy & Physiology

Article

Where Does Laminitis Start?

December 01, 2003

New research will help determine where laminitis begins and how it affects internal structures of the foot. Hoof researcher David Hood, DVM, PhD, and his staff at the Hoof Diagnostic and Rehabilitation Clinic at Texas A&M University, joined... Read More

Article

Stallion Breeding: Can He or Can't He?

November 01, 2003

Regardless of the number of mares being bred, it is important to monitor the stallion's reproductive success in order to maintain his reputation and give yourself time to address any problems he might have. ... Read More

Article

The Basics of Breakover

November 01, 2003

What exactly is breakover? Most would answer that it is the horse's heel lifting off the ground and rotating over the toe as his foot leaves the ground. Breakover is simple in its definition, but pretty complex in its implications for your... Read More

Article

Surviving Colic

November 01, 2003

In decades past, colic treatment was actually a misnomer. "Treatment" consisted of waiting out the colic while offering sedative-like drugs to dampen a horse's misery. Either his body healed of its own accord, or he succumbed to death from... Read More

Article

Early Season Breeding: Let There Be Light!

October 01, 2003

Because of the demands of competition and sales, following the natural reproductive cycle dictated by Mother Nature often doesn't fit into man's breeding program. While Mother Nature's time frame stipulates that the mare should be receptive to... Read More

Article

Steroid Effects on the Knees

October 01, 2003

During intensive training, young racehorses experience a thickening in the layers of bone under the cartilage of joints. These layers, called subchondral (located nearer the surface) and cancellous, become harder and better able to handle the... Read More

Article

Hunter's Bump

October 01, 2003

Named for the sport in which it often occurs, hunter's (or jumper's) bump is a sometimes painful pelvic condition that affects performance and gait. It's tricky to diagnose, occurs in horses which do many different disciplines, and can be an... Read More

Article

Training Young Athletes

October 01, 2003

It sounds completely backwards, the idea that you might actually increase health risks by postponing training and competition until a horse is four or older. It goes against the ages-old and widely held belief that you cause damage by initiating... Read More

Article

Hyperimmune Plasma for WNV Horses

September 10, 2003

Veterinarians have been using an antibody product to treat West Nile virus (WNV) clinical signs, but its use for this purpose is currently off-label (not approved by the USDA). Currently, the hyperimmune plasma product HiGamm-Equi, by Lake... Read More

Article

West Nile Virus Treatment Licensed

September 05, 2003

Novartis Animal Vaccines announced Aug. 19 the conditional licensing and availability of the only antibody product approved by the USDA to help control disease caused by West Nile virus (WNV) in equids. This product helps an exposed animal by... Read More

Article

Shock Wave Therapy -- Does It Work?

September 01, 2003

What is shock wave therapy? Extracorporeal shock wave therapy focuses a highly concentrated, powerful acoustical (sound) energy source to a focal area. The shock waves induce increased activity of bone-producing cells and might also lead to increased... Read More

Article

Anatomy of a Trim

August 01, 2003

Why do we ask farriers to take knives and nippers (and sometimes a whole lot more) to our horses' feet every six weeks? For many of us, it has always been just one of those things you knew you had to do if you had horses. And we might have also... Read More

Article

Tufts Conference Examines the Foot, Inside and Out

August 01, 2003

Adapting to the environment, informed by genetic codes, and endeavoring to meet human demands, the horse's hoof is like an individual fingerprint on the human hand. Decoding the process the horse uses to arrive at his ideal hoof form filled thre... Read More

Article

Does Fat Really Impact Digestion of Fiber?

July 01, 2003

Dietary fats are important components of performance horses' diets because they are calorie-dense and energy-rich. Previous studies have shown, however, that diets high in soybean oil interfere with fiber digestion in trotters. It is unclear... Read More

Article

The Inner Mare

July 01, 2003

Owners of mares should know correct anatomical terminology, have a working knowledge of the normal reproductive cycle, and be acquainted with common problems that could occur. The following article is designed to help mare owners understand the... Read More

Article

Limb Deformities: Congenital or Acquired?

July 01, 2003

As the foal takes his initial stance, a proud owner takes stock to see how straight and strong the youngster's legs are. Many foals are born with seemingly crooked legs (congenital). Most of these crooked legs straighten by the time the foal is ... Read More

Article

Supplementing Enzymes in the Equine Diet

June 25, 2003

Researchers have discovered that supplementing enzymes could help digestion of starch in the equine small intestine. "With dietary enzyme supplementation and enhanced small intestinal starch digestion, the feeding of cereal grains to horses will... Read More

Article

What Boys Are Made Of

June 01, 2003

An appreciation of normal reproductive anatomy is essential to the competent physical examination of the stallion's reproductive tract. If you are involved in breeding, then you should be familiar with what is considered normal so you know when... Read More

Article

A View Within: Reproductive Ultrasound

May 01, 2003

Since the early 1980s, the use of ultrasound has revolutionized our understanding of mare reproductive physiology, and with it stud management. Ultrasound allows the practitioner to diagnose problems and monitor reproductive activity with... Read More

Article

Equine Metabolic Syndrome and Laminitis

May 01, 2003

Of particular interest to horse owners was Johnson's black-and-white linkage of the newly termed EMS condition with laminitis and obesity. "Obesity-associated insulin refractory state" was Johnson's precise description of "Equine Metabolic Syndrome" ... Read More

Article

Joint Pressure in the Foot

May 01, 2003

New research from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) in the United Kingdom has advanced hoof balance from a farrier's art form to a measurement of pressure inside the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint (coffin joint). Some day, a horse's ideal... Read More

Article

Cutting-Edge Hoof Education

May 01, 2003

All of the cutting-edge hoof information presented at this symposium is very helpful to the fledgling field of equine podiatry. Equally valuable is the open, helpful atmosphere in which everyone is learning and helping each other understand new conce... Read More

Article

Exercise and Ulcers: Is it the Norm?

April 01, 2003

University of Florida (UF) research has shown that any exercise above a walk could force acidic gastric juices up into sensitive areas of the equine stomach, which could be why ulcers develop or worsen in horses in training (affecting more than... Read More

Article

Understanding the Venogram

March 07, 2003

This procedure allows veterinarians to see blood flow in the foot.

Although it's still not widely used, the venogram (a procedure for visualizing blood flow within the foot) has been acclaimed by many as an essential tool... Read More

Article

Hock Joint Mechanics: Bluegrass Laminitis Symposium

March 05, 2003

“One of the most frequent sites of lameness is the hock joint,” said Hilary Clayton, BVMS, PhD, MRCVS, Mary Anne McPhail Dressage Chair in Equine Sports Medicine at Michigan State University (MSU), in her presentation “A New Look at the Hock... Read More