Recent News for Anatomy & Physiology

Article

Developments in Understanding Laminitis

February 11, 2004

For those who follow horse laminitis research, the name of Chris Pollitt, BVSc, PhD, is synonymous with advanced research on the subject. At a recent laminitis conference, he discussed research into hoof growth, laminitis triggers, and cryotherapy.... Read More

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Hoof Wall Growth and Adaptability

February 08, 2004

The structural appearance of the foot is continually being modified by the interactions of the foot with the environment and the environment's influences on the foot and hoof wall. The term environmental influences includes just about everything that... Read More

Article

Cribbing: Effect on Colic (AAEP 2003)

February 04, 2004

Cribbing, the oral stereotypic behavior in which the horse grabs an object with his teeth while flexing his neck and sometimes swallowing air, has long been suspected as a cause of colic. ... Read More

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Linking Chronic Laminitis to Immunologic Hyperreactivity

February 01, 2004

The pathogenesis of chronic laminitis remains unclear. There is growing evidence, however, of a link between this condition and the development of certain systemic diseases, such as kidney disease, that involve small blood vessel damage. There... Read More

Article

Mare/Foal Interaction

February 01, 2004

Abby L. Fowden, of the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, discussed nutritive and endocrine functions of the placenta at the first Equine Placenta Workshop held at the University of Kentucky Gluck Equine Research Center on Dec. 5-6,... Read More

Article

Evaluating and Measuring Hoof Shape

February 01, 2004

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, recently developed a new three-dimensional system for measuring various aspects of the horse's sole. One day their work might help ascertain if hoof shape abnormalities can be predictors of... Read More

Article

Foal Care From Birth to 30 Days (AAEP 2003)

January 31, 2004

Foal care from the first few hours of life to one month can be critical in the overall health and welfare of the newborn foal.... Read More

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When a Foal Needs Surgery (AAEP 2003)

January 31, 2004

If your new foal develops a disease or medical problem that requires surgery, then time is of the essence. In his AAEP Convention presentation "Surgical Disease of the Neonate," Rolf Embertson, DVM, Dipl. ACVS, of Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital... Read More

Article

The Equine Stomach (AAEP 2003: Milne Lecture)

January 31, 2004

Merritt's presentation highlighted advances made over the last 40 years in the understanding of how the equine stomach functions and its related diseases. His presentation had a special emphasis on equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS), and slides of ... Read More

Article

Clinical and Radiographic Examination of the Equine Foot

January 28, 2004

1. Introduction

Lameness is one of the most frequently encountered problems in equine practice. The foot is involved, either directly or indirectly, in the large majority of lameness cases, because it is the first line o... Read More

Article

Glass Horse Model Expanded

January 07, 2004

The popular three-dimensional electronic horse model, "The Glass Horse CD," which offered a novel look at the gastrointestinal anatomy of the horse when it was introduced in November of 2001, has a new companion that depicts the structures of th... Read More

Article

The Facts of Life

December 01, 2003

The fertilization of an egg and subsequent growth of one tiny cell into the perfect foal is a very complex process. Understanding the various stages of development can help you understand how pregnancies can be challenged and what's going on in... Read More

Article

Where Does Laminitis Start?

December 01, 2003

New research will help determine where laminitis begins and how it affects internal structures of the foot. Hoof researcher David Hood, DVM, PhD, and his staff at the Hoof Diagnostic and Rehabilitation Clinic at Texas A&M University, joined... Read More

Article

Stallion Breeding: Can He or Can't He?

November 01, 2003

Regardless of the number of mares being bred, it is important to monitor the stallion's reproductive success in order to maintain his reputation and give yourself time to address any problems he might have. ... Read More

Article

The Basics of Breakover

November 01, 2003

What exactly is breakover? Most would answer that it is the horse's heel lifting off the ground and rotating over the toe as his foot leaves the ground. Breakover is simple in its definition, but pretty complex in its implications for your... Read More

Article

Surviving Colic

November 01, 2003

In decades past, colic treatment was actually a misnomer. "Treatment" consisted of waiting out the colic while offering sedative-like drugs to dampen a horse's misery. Either his body healed of its own accord, or he succumbed to death from... Read More

Article

Early Season Breeding: Let There Be Light!

October 01, 2003

Because of the demands of competition and sales, following the natural reproductive cycle dictated by Mother Nature often doesn't fit into man's breeding program. While Mother Nature's time frame stipulates that the mare should be receptive to... Read More

Article

Steroid Effects on the Knees

October 01, 2003

During intensive training, young racehorses experience a thickening in the layers of bone under the cartilage of joints. These layers, called subchondral (located nearer the surface) and cancellous, become harder and better able to handle the... Read More

Article

Hunter's Bump

October 01, 2003

Named for the sport in which it often occurs, hunter's (or jumper's) bump is a sometimes painful pelvic condition that affects performance and gait. It's tricky to diagnose, occurs in horses which do many different disciplines, and can be an... Read More

Article

Training Young Athletes

October 01, 2003

It sounds completely backwards, the idea that you might actually increase health risks by postponing training and competition until a horse is four or older. It goes against the ages-old and widely held belief that you cause damage by initiating... Read More

Article

Hyperimmune Plasma for WNV Horses

September 10, 2003

Veterinarians have been using an antibody product to treat West Nile virus (WNV) clinical signs, but its use for this purpose is currently off-label (not approved by the USDA). Currently, the hyperimmune plasma product HiGamm-Equi, by Lake... Read More

Article

West Nile Virus Treatment Licensed

September 05, 2003

Novartis Animal Vaccines announced Aug. 19 the conditional licensing and availability of the only antibody product approved by the USDA to help control disease caused by West Nile virus (WNV) in equids. This product helps an exposed animal by... Read More

Article

Shock Wave Therapy -- Does It Work?

September 01, 2003

What is shock wave therapy? Extracorporeal shock wave therapy focuses a highly concentrated, powerful acoustical (sound) energy source to a focal area. The shock waves induce increased activity of bone-producing cells and might also lead to increased... Read More

Article

Anatomy of a Trim

August 01, 2003

Why do we ask farriers to take knives and nippers (and sometimes a whole lot more) to our horses' feet every six weeks? For many of us, it has always been just one of those things you knew you had to do if you had horses. And we might have also... Read More

Article

Tufts Conference Examines the Foot, Inside and Out

August 01, 2003

Adapting to the environment, informed by genetic codes, and endeavoring to meet human demands, the horse's hoof is like an individual fingerprint on the human hand. Decoding the process the horse uses to arrive at his ideal hoof form filled thre... Read More