Recent News for Anatomy & Physiology

Article

Equine Podiatry: Gaining a Foothold

August 01, 2004

The reason for this is that equine podiatry is still in its infancy, and while there are a lot of very intelligent people working to better understand the horse's foot, it's still a very complex structure with no real analogue in the human physique, ... Read More

Article

The Australian Take on Laminitis

August 01, 2004

The second most-common killer of our horses after colic is laminitis. The disease is a crisis, and it is often chronic and life-altering. It can be caused by illness unrelated to the foot, such as a retained placenta or grain overload. It can be... Read More

Article

Treating Navicular Disease From Inside the Bone

July 01, 2004

Healthy bone undergoes constant metabolic change to prevent bone loss or abnormal remodeling (cell turnover) that can occur with loading. Horses with navicular disease can have abnormal remodeling and formation of osteolytic lesions (areas of... Read More

Article

Endurance and Endotoxemia

July 01, 2004

Endotoxemia in horses is usually associated with severe infections, inflammation, and colic. Endotoxin from intestinal bacteria activates release of inflammatory mediators such as thromboxane B2 (TxB2), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha),... Read More

Article

Problems in the Hip and Pelvis

July 01, 2004

When you think about equine lameness, you probably think first about the bones, muscles, tendons, and ligaments of the leg, and of course the hoof. But lameness can also stem from trouble higher up the skeleton, including the pelvic (or... Read More

Article

Beasts of Burden

June 01, 2004

Any horse owner who tours the medieval gallery at a museum must stop at the displays of suits of armor and marvel. Imagine the sheer weight of such an outfit--then imagine trying to maneuver oneself into the saddle wearing it! Visions of... Read More

Article

Foot Care for Foals

June 01, 2004

A foal's future performance in competition, or as a pleasure riding companion, depends in large part on how his feet are cared for in the first six months of his life. ... Read More

Article

Managing Hoof Problems in Horses

June 01, 2004

Just about every horse out there has what we might call a hoof problem on at least one of his four feet. It might be a simple mismatch that might not be a problem, or it might be much more serious. In any case, hoof problems, regardless ... Read More

Article

Identifying Sacroiliac Joint Pain

May 01, 2004

A diagnosis of sacroiliac joint (SI) pain tends to be one of exclusion, after other causes of hind limb lameness have been ruled out. To simplify the diagnostic process, researchers in the United Kingdom conducted a study involving 74 horses... Read More

Article

Cushing's Disease and Laminitis--Not Just Old Horses

April 01, 2004

Researchers recently revealed that Cushing's disease is a major contributing factor to laminitis among horses in a primary care veterinary practice, and that the median age of laminitic Cushing's horses was 15 1/2 years--disproving tha... Read More

Article

Diet: When Horses Need Less Carbs

April 01, 2004

Research suggests some horses (growing foals, laminitic horses, etc.) could do well on low-glycemic diets. ... Read More

Compression of the spinal cord, whether because of misaligned or malformed vertebrae or some other problem, causes the distinctive "wobble" of wobbler syndrome. This compression injures or kills the nerves that are responsible for sensing the position of the limbs. This, of course, leads to the lack of awareness that causes clumsiness and incoordination.

Article

What's Wobbler Syndrome?

April 01, 2004

Wobbler, also known as wobbles, takes its name from its primary sign--a wobbling or uncoordinated gait. ... Read More

Article

Colic Surgery and Reperfusion Injury

March 01, 2004

During colic surgery, it can be difficult to judge whether twisted bowel deprived of oxygenated blood, a process called ischemia, will recover sufficiently once it is replaced and blood flows again. While the bowel might look healthy on the outside, ... Read More

Article

Managing Thin, Shelly Feet

March 01, 2004

Poor genetics, environment, nutrition, and foot care are the main causes of thin, shelly feet according to Ken Marcella, DVM, and farrier Jaye Perry. Marcella co-owns Chattahoochee Equine in Canton, Ga., and Perry, a farrier based in Cumming,... Read More

Article

Good and Bad-Footed Horses

February 25, 2004

Bowker, one of the foremost researchers on the structure of the horse's foot, discussed several characteristics that differ between "good" feet and "bad" feet in great detail. First, however, he defined what most consider a good, strong foot.... Read More

Article

Nutrient Requirements of the Foot

February 23, 2004

"The hoof is a truly dynamic architecture, and its nutrient supply is critical for its strength and function," said Connie Swenson, PhD, research nutritionist with Zinpro Corporation, at the Second International Equine Conference on Laminitis an... Read More

Article

Gastrointestinal Rupture Clinical Signs (AAEP 2003)

February 17, 2004

Results of the study could help veterinarians know what signs to look for to make a definitive diagnosis of intestinal rupture, thus allowing them to prevent prolonged suffering of the affected horse and additional expense to the horse owner, as euth... Read More

Article

Developments in Understanding Laminitis

February 11, 2004

For those who follow horse laminitis research, the name of Chris Pollitt, BVSc, PhD, is synonymous with advanced research on the subject. At a recent laminitis conference, he discussed research into hoof growth, laminitis triggers, and cryotherapy.... Read More

Article

Hoof Wall Growth and Adaptability

February 08, 2004

The structural appearance of the foot is continually being modified by the interactions of the foot with the environment and the environment's influences on the foot and hoof wall. The term environmental influences includes just about everything that... Read More

Article

Cribbing: Effect on Colic (AAEP 2003)

February 04, 2004

Cribbing, the oral stereotypic behavior in which the horse grabs an object with his teeth while flexing his neck and sometimes swallowing air, has long been suspected as a cause of colic. ... Read More

Article

Linking Chronic Laminitis to Immunologic Hyperreactivity

February 01, 2004

The pathogenesis of chronic laminitis remains unclear. There is growing evidence, however, of a link between this condition and the development of certain systemic diseases, such as kidney disease, that involve small blood vessel damage. There... Read More

Article

Mare/Foal Interaction

February 01, 2004

Abby L. Fowden, of the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, discussed nutritive and endocrine functions of the placenta at the first Equine Placenta Workshop held at the University of Kentucky Gluck Equine Research Center on Dec. 5-6,... Read More

Article

Evaluating and Measuring Hoof Shape

February 01, 2004

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, recently developed a new three-dimensional system for measuring various aspects of the horse's sole. One day their work might help ascertain if hoof shape abnormalities can be predictors of... Read More

Article

Foal Care From Birth to 30 Days (AAEP 2003)

January 31, 2004

Foal care from the first few hours of life to one month can be critical in the overall health and welfare of the newborn foal.... Read More

Article

When a Foal Needs Surgery (AAEP 2003)

January 31, 2004

If your new foal develops a disease or medical problem that requires surgery, then time is of the essence. In his AAEP Convention presentation "Surgical Disease of the Neonate," Rolf Embertson, DVM, Dipl. ACVS, of Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital... Read More