Recent News for Anatomy & Physiology

Article

Supporting Limb Laminitis: Learning How to Save Horses Such As Barbaro

February 03, 2007

Barbaro's death might lead one to think that despite the best veterinary care available, horses with severe leg injuries and/or laminitis are unrecoverable and should be immediately destroyed. But one equine veterinarian says that couldn't be further... Read More

Article

Overexcited Stallion

February 01, 2007

I have a stallion that "saucers" (exhibits glans penis enlargement) prior to mounting. Any suggestions?... Read More

Article

Endometritis Diagnosis and Management

February 01, 2007

When a mare is bred by natural cover, the uterine lining, or endometrium, becomes inflamed. The stallion deposits semen in the uterus, as well as bacteria, bits of debris, and seminal fluid. The normally sterile uterus becomes irritated and... Read More

Article

Warming Up to the Idea

February 01, 2007

Riders understand the importance of warming up as a way to ready the horse's mind and body for the challenges ahead, but there is more to a warm-up than simple preparation. Correctly done, prior exercise substantially benefits physical performance... Read More

Article

Carbohydrates: Sugars and Starches

January 01, 2007

Low-carb has found its way into equine diets, with owners demanding feed products with low carb levels. ... Read More

Article

Bulking Up, Not Adding On

December 03, 2006

Although training might make your yearling look like a bodybuilder, that physique doesn't guarantee athletic prowess. Evolutionary factors--not early speed or exercise programs--determine the amount of fast-twitch muscle horses have as adults.... Read More

Article

Basics of Life

December 01, 2006

Reproduction in all species borders on the miraculous. How else can one describe a process where two infinitesimal entities, one from the male, the other from the female, join forces to produce living, breathing offspring?

Reproductive... Read More

Article

Rutgers Equine Science Center Annual Update Set for Dec. 12

November 09, 2006

The Rutgers Equine Science Center will sponsor its annual Equine Science Update on Tuesday, December 12, 2006 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the New Jersey Museum of Agriculture on the Cook Campus of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.... Read More

Article

Anatomy and Physiology Part 11: Of Blood and Breath

November 01, 2006

There are few similarities between horses and automobiles, but in a manner of speaking, the horse's circulatory and respiratory systems constitute its engine. The food a horse consumes is its fuel. The fuel is converted into nutritional energy that... Read More

Article

The Equine Digestive System: A Food Factory

October 01, 2006

The equine digestive system is a complicated factory that is designed to process small amounts of food frequently and convert them into nutrients that can be absorbed and produce energy. The same, concerning the end result, could be said of the cow... Read More

Article

Angular Limb Deformities in Foals

September 20, 2006

Some of the common bone abnormalities of young foals are referred to as angular limb deformities. Instead of having straight legs, a foal is born with an angle or crook in its legs, similar to a person who is bowlegged. This angular... Read More

Article

An Equine Athlete's Heart

September 14, 2006

Trainers, owners, and researchers have long pondered the effects of a large heart (one that is naturally occurring and not a result of disease), and have even attempted to use heart size as a predictor of athletic ability.... Read More

Article

Small Volume Resuscitation in Anesthetized Endotoxemic Horses

September 14, 2006

Endotoxemia occurs when toxins from the wall of Gram-negative bacteria crosses the intestinal wall and gains access to the bloodstream. Endotoxin becomes concentrated on the surface of white blood cells, causing them to secrete inflammatory agents. ... Read More

Article

Tendons and Ligaments: Anatomy and Physiology

September 01, 2006

Tendons and ligaments in the horse are the "belts" and "cables" that hold bones in place and allow the muscles to do their jobs in creating propulsion-- forward, backward, sideways, and up and down. Because of the workload often put upon them, tendon... Read More

Article

Body Builders--Muscles

August 01, 2006

Muscles are one of the most important components in the equine body. Without them, the horse would be unable to walk, chew and digest food, or even swish his tail. Muscles comprise the largest tissue mass in the horse's body. There are various types ... Read More

Article

The Equine Back: Conformation and Injuries

July 01, 2006

Even a horse with excellent conformation can wind up with back problems if ridden by a rider out of balance or if outfitted with inappropriate tack.... Read More

Article

Anatomy and Physiology Part 6: The Head and Neck

June 01, 2006

The equine head can be compared to a computer. Housed within the skull are the major components--the brain and the sense organs. In addition to functioning like a computer, the equine head contains teeth for cropping grass and chewing food, and all... Read More

Article

Hoof Structure and Foot Facts (Book Excerpt)

May 17, 2006

The old saying, "No hoof, no horse" is very true, especially as it pertains to the horse's working ability and soundness. The horse is an athlete; we use him for a variety of athletic purposes -- racing, jumping, chasing cattle, pulling carts.... Read More

Article

Anatomy and Physiology Part 5: The Equine Foot

May 01, 2006

The equine lexicon is filled with clichés about the equine foot. Most horse owners have heard them all. "No foot, no horse...The foot is the horse's foundation...For want of a shoe..." The list goes on. Without sound feet, a horse can't move... Read More

Article

The Perfect Engine

April 01, 2006

Much has already been stated in this series about the special concerns involving front limb soundness in the horse since 60-65% of the animal's weight is carried in the front end. This does not mean that there are no concerns involving the... Read More

Article

On the Forehand

March 01, 2006

The foreleg of the horse is, for the most part, a model of good engineering. It is structured in such a fashion that the horse can move slowly or at speed with the concussion of each footfall minimized by a sophisticated shock absorbing system.... Read More

Article

Musculoskeletal Disease Biomarkers

March 01, 2006

Colorado State University (CSU) researchers have found significant patterns of six different signals of damage or "biomarkers" in the serum of racehorses with certain musculoskeletal diseases.

Biomarkers are indicators of abnormal... Read More

Article

Laminitis (AAEP Convention 2005)

February 17, 2006

What causes laminitis? Is it the same as founder? Should I remove shoes from a horse with acute laminitis? Should I soak his feet? Does laminitis always have devastating consequences?... Read More

Article

Synovial Joints and How They Work

February 01, 2006

First we'll look at how the horse's synovial joints are constructed, then we'll outline where they are located, the functions they serve, and some of the problems that can develop.... Read More

Article

Hoof Trimming and Leg Stress: One Step at a Time

January 01, 2006

As a rule of thumb, we know that our horses should be trimmed (and shod if necessary) at least every six to eight weeks. But where did those numbers come from? Van Heel recently studied how a hoof changes between trims, and she found that neglecting ... Read More