Recent News for Sports Medicine

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Preakness Runner-Up Positive for West Nile Virus, Condition Improving

September 11, 2002

Magic Weisner, the popular gelding who finished second at long odds in the Preakness, was diagnosed Monday with West Nile virus (WNV), said Dr. Bob Vallance, a Maryland veterinarian.

Vallance, Magic Weisner's local veterinarian, has bee... Read More

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Eventing Recommended for Exclusion from the 2008 Olympics

September 04, 2002

The Olympic Programme Commission report recommending that eventing be excluded from the 2008 Olympics was presented to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) Executive Board on Aug. 28 in Lausanne, Switzerland. The commission was in... Read More

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Racing Toward Injury

September 01, 2002

There seems to be little doubt that musculoskeletal injury--including injury to bones, joints, tendons, and ligaments--is a major problem for Thoroughbred racehorses. This impression has been borne out by studies of "wastage" in the racing... Read More

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Mosquito Infected with West Nile Virus Found at Churchill Downs

August 23, 2002

Officials with the Jefferson County, Ky. Health Department said that at least one mosquito infected with West Nile virus has been found at Churchill Downs.

The discovery of the mosquito came during a routine examination of a group of... Read More

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California Joins Growing List of States to Ban EPO

August 22, 2002

Erythropoietin, a human medication designed to increase the concentration of red blood cells that is rumored to be in use on racehorses, has been added to the list of prohibited veterinary substances on racing premises by the California Horse... Read More

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Radiographs and Selecting Racehorses

August 22, 2002

Veterinarians should select racehorses at auction, not "radiographically clean horses," Thoroughbred farm Three Chimneys' resident veterinarian Jim Morehead, DVM, told Australia's leading equine veterinarians at a yearling radiographic seminar... Read More

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Derby Winner, Top Japanese Sire Sunday Silence Dies

August 19, 2002

The long vigil is over. After 14 weeks of battle, Sunday Silence died of heart failure Sunday, Aug. 19, brought on by infection in his leg and the debilitating effects of laminitis.

At Shadai Stallion Station in Japan's Hokkaido, where... Read More

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Churchill Downs, Farms Take Steps Against West Nile Virus

August 15, 2002

Churchill Downs' primary weapon against the West Nile virus (WNV) sits in a clear, plastic vial on the desk of track superintendent Butch Lehr, according to AP writer Chris Duncan.

The vial holds birdseed-like pellets that release a... Read More

Article

Locked Into Place

August 01, 2002

Much has been learned about exertional rhabdomyolysis (tying-up) in recent years, but unfortunately some of that knowledge has been troubling. For example, at least one newly recognized cause of tying-up in foals has, in identified cases, always... Read More

Article

Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy and Back Pain

August 01, 2002

As many as 40% of all cases of equine back pain are the result of soft tissue injury. The primary causes include chronic and recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis (CER and RER, respectively), and an inherited enzyme deficiency called polysaccharid... Read More

Article

Carbohydrates for Energy

August 01, 2002

In human nutrition, carbohydrates or "carbs" have a bit of a bad name these days. A quick trip through the local book store or over the Internet leads us to believe that dietary carbohydrates are the source of all evil. When weight loss is the... Read More

Article

Providing Care for Your Senior Horse

August 01, 2002

Technology and advances in medicine have given us tools to keep our horses alive longer.... Read More

Article

Poppies Causing Positive Drug Tests Down Under

July 31, 2002

According to an Associated Press story, poppies grown on the Australian island state of Tasmania for the pharmaceutical industry are causing controversy by producing positive opium tests in racehorses. Six horses have been disqualified in the... Read More

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American Humane Association Aids Animals in Minnesota

July 19, 2002

The American Humane Association has donated $2,000 to provide an emergency food supply for 30 horses and 1,100 head of livestock affected by the flooding in Minnesota. Combined with a matching donation by the Humane Society of the United States,... Read More

Article

Fire at The Thoroughbred Center Kills Two Horses

July 10, 2002

A barn fire late Monday night killed two horses at The Thoroughbred Center near Lexington, KY. The fire, which was contained to two stalls of a 20-stall barn adjacent to the training track, is suspected to have started near an electric fan... Read More

Article

Tying-Up in Horses

July 01, 2002

Tying-up is the most common muscle problem in horses. This syndrome is also called azoturia, set fast, paralytic myoglobinuria, and chronic exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER). HYPP (hyperkalemic periodic paralysis) in Quarter Horses is a different... Read More

Article

Fatigue in Racehorses

July 01, 2002

While visibly obvious, fatigue is hard to quantify. Electromyography (EMG) measures conduction along nerves in a particular muscle group--as muscle fibers fatigue, EMG signals shift from high to low. Taking EMG readings during galloping is... Read More

Article

Wanted: Consumer Involvement

June 28, 2002

In recent months, there has been a good deal of discussion regarding the legality of many ingredients that horse and pet owners take for granted in supplements. Much of this discussion has centered on the proposed enforcement action by the... Read More

Article

Belmont Ball Raises $150,000 for Equine Research

June 17, 2002

The Belmont Ball, hosted by the New York Racing Association on June 6 at Belmont Park, raised more than $150,000 for the Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation.

The black-tie event featured a live auction with items ranging from box... Read More

Article

MSM and Inflammation

June 05, 2002

Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), a white, tasteless crystalline powder, is already a favored supplement in the horse industry. Years before any scientific evidence supported its use, it had earned a reputation for helping alleviate many of the... Read More

Article

Regulation of Supplements

June 01, 2002

Recently, an alarm was sounded that "the authorities" are trying to take away supplement products sold over-the-counter to horse owners. Some people have portrayed it as if Big Brother were trying to keep useful products away from the animals... Read More

Article

Recharge Your Horse's Batteries

June 01, 2002

For horses engaged in regular conditioning and competition, an important consideration for overall health and fitness is the speed of recovery following hard workouts and competition exercise. A bout of exercise burns body fuel, results in loss... Read More

Article

Supplemental Cooperation

June 01, 2002

Since last month's column, a big step forward was taken by some manufacturers in the supplement industry. This step forestalled any "en masse" immediate regulatory action; however, it does not mean state feed regulators can't or won't enforce... Read More

Article

Laryngeal Paralysis

June 01, 2002

Partial paralysis of the larynx prevents maximal opening of the equine trachea. Affected horses can move air, but breathing noises occur, especially during exercise. The most common form of laryngeal paralysis is recurrent laryngeal neuropathy... Read More

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Supplement Regulation News

June 01, 2002

The threat of a supplement regulatory crackdown motivated 25 ingredient suppliers, manufacturers, and distributors to join with the National Animal Supplement Council (NASC) on April 3-4 to hammer out a proposed Compliance Plus program. This... Read More