Farm Call: Your Questions Answered

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When Your Horse Thinks He's a Termite...

November 01, 2001

Q.

Q: Is chewing pressure-treated wood (the green-tinged wood) dangerous for horses?

Catherine

Q: Our horses have started eating our fences and tree bark quite frequently this year. They run on pasture, get 10% sweet feed once a day, and have salt blocks all over the pasture. Are they missing a supplement or vitamin?

A. Read the Vet's Answer

Phenylbutazone (Bute) Longevity

November 01, 2001

Q.

I was wondering how many days phenylbutazone (Bute) can stay in a horse's system? I have a horse which has to stay on this medication on a fairly constant basis.

Carole

If you mean how long is the drug effective at reducing inflammation or how long can it be detected in serum or urine, the answers are different. Also, dosage is a significant factor, as

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Breeding Horses With Genetic Disorders

November 01, 2001

Q.

I read on your site that two or three Quarter Horse stallions might be traced to the syndrome of polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM). I have a performance Quarter Horse filly with PSSM, and I feel it is important to know who these sires are so I can be an informed and responsible breeder. The filly is great, but in picking out a stallion for her I would not want to double up on the

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Bouncing Knees a Problem?

November 01, 2001

Q.

I have a 6-year-old Quarter Horse gelding that I trail ride in the mountains. He is noticeably "over at the knees." Often while riding, one knee or the other will wobble forward and back when we pause. He doesn't appear lame or swollen, but the bouncing makes me wonder if his tendons are sore. Most of my rides have uphill climbing, and I don't want to Bute him for every ride (three or fou

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Nephrosplenic Entrapment

November 01, 2001

Q.

Q: My 17-year-old Quarter Horse had surgery in September of 2000 for nephrosplenic entrapment (in which the large colon becomes hooked over the nephrosplenic ligament). We went back on June 13 for the same surgery. They recommended that we change his diet to senior feed and timothy hay, and begin light work after two months of recovery. I don't show; my horses are just for

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Problems With Blue Eyes?

October 12, 2001

Q.

Q: I'm looking at a Quarter Horse cross who is about 12 years old and appears to be perfectly healthy. My only concern is that he has two blue eyes. I have not had a pre-purchase vet exam done yet due to the vet's busy schedule, but was wondering if there is possibly a vision problem with a horse that has two blue eyes.

Loni


A

A. Read the Vet's Answer

Geldings and Equine Viral Arteritis (EVA)

October 12, 2001

Q.

Q: Is it possible for a gelding to have equine viral arteritis? I've read all about this disease in mares and stallions, but I have not read anything about it in geldings.

Nikki


A: It is certainly possible for a gelding to develop this disease. All categories of horses are

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Pre-Purchase Exams

October 01, 2001

Q.

Q: Over the years, I've had a number of pre-purchase exams done on my horses. I've come to realize that one vet will read an X ray and say a horse has arthritis, osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), navicular problems, etc., but when you have a different vet read the same X rays, they will come up with totally different findings. Why is

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Disposal of Euthanized Animals

October 01, 2001

Q. Q: I work at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, Md., with the Marine Animal Rescue Program. Occasionally a large marine mammal requires euthanasia. Are there risks to other animals that may eat the carcass of a euthanized horse or other animal?

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Wry Nose in Horses?

October 01, 2001

Q. I would like information on wry nose (laterally deviated rostral maxilla). I had a foal born with it and never heard of it before then. I would like to know what causes it and any other information about this condition. Also, how common is it in horses?

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Spleen Problems

September 17, 2001

Q. I remember reading that a horse's spleen is unique, but my friend said that horses don't even have a spleen. What's the truth?

A. Read the Vet's Answer

Tying-Up Syndrome

September 13, 2001

Q.

I just bought a Thoroughbred filly which was in race training, but retired without running because of recurrent bouts of ‘tying-up.’ She had been turned out for six months before I got her, and never showed any problems while on the farm. What can you tell me about this disease?

Tying-up is a syndrome or description of a horse with muscle damage that has many different causes

A. Read the Vet's Answer

Life After Colic Surgery

August 01, 2001

Q.

Q: My horse had successful colic surgery about 3 1/2 years ago. He is now for sale, but as soon as someone hears that he had the surgery, they are no longer interested and ignore all the good points about the horse. Is there any statistical data that shows a correlation between colic surgery and future health?

Jerry


A. Read the Vet's Answer

If All Else Fails, Use Baycox?

August 01, 2001

Q.

Several Standardbred trainers have told me that when a vet cannot find what is wrong with their horses, the vet will suggest putting them on Baycox. I recently had two vets tell me to try my 3-year-old trotter on Baycox. They had gone all over him and thought that might help him where nothing else has. He has had no tests, blood or spinal. So my question is: What else can this drug do to

A. Read the Vet's Answer

Manure Eating in Adult Horse

July 01, 2001

Q.

We have a seven-year-old draft cross gelding who was treated for Lyme disease in October of 2000 with 8 grams of doxycycline (a broad-spectrum tetracycline antibiotic) twice daily for three weeks. Since that time, and not previously, we have witnessed him eating fresh manure of his pasture mates. We presumed that daily probiotics (Accel) would restore the gut flora, which we assumed he wa

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Who Owns Radiographs?

June 01, 2001

Q. Q: My vet took some X rays of my horse's legs. I paid the bill in full, but when I asked for the X rays, he said they belonged to him and not me. Is this correct? If I'm charged for the X rays, why can't I have them? A: Many veterinarians run into this situation, not only equine veterinarians. To the client, it makes sense that he or she would own the radiographs (X rays) since he or she paid...

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The Club Foot

June 01, 2001

Q.

Q: After seeing the conformation of several weanlings at a sale recently, I noticed that my weanling had a strange-looking foot. On closer examination of his leg, his foot seemed a bit boxy. Will I still be able to sell him at the sales next year, and will he be able to perform as an athlete? My veterinarian said it sounds like he has a club foot. What does this mean?

A. Read the Vet's Answer

Sole Bruise Lameness

June 01, 2001

Q. This morning my Quarter Horse gelding was lame to the point where he did not want to bear any weight on his left hind foot. My barn manager thinks it might be a sole bruise. What is a sole bruise? What should I do about it until my vet arrives?

A. Read the Vet's Answer

Warts

June 01, 2001

Q.

Q: My yearling has broken out with warts around his mouth. These warts have become quite unsightly. How do I treat him, and will they come back? Should I quarantine him so he does not spread the warts to my other horses?


A: Warts are caused by the papillomavirus, and they usually appear as blemishes on the face, mouth, or nose regions in younger

A. Read the Vet's Answer

Young Foal Exercise

June 01, 2001

Q.

 When do I start my foal on an exercise program? My champion show jumper just gave birth to a foal a couple of weeks ago, and I want to give him every advantage possible since I have plans for him to be my next champion show jumper. What type of exercise should I start him with, and when?

An exercise program designed to build muscle

A. Read the Vet's Answer

Graveled Horses

June 01, 2001

Q.

Q: My horse became very lame without showing any signs of cracks, bruising, or having a "hot" nail. The barn manager said my horse was "graveled" and called the veterinarian. After treatment, the horse became fine, but since my horse is never on gravel, could you please explain the term?


A: The diagnosis of a

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Dirty Mares

June 01, 2001

Q. Vet Q&A: My veterinarian said my mare probably didn't conceive this year because she was "dirty." We treated her and cleared up her problem, but what are our chances of getting her pregnant, and could she get "dirty" again? A: The term "dirty mare" can be very complicated, and one that applies to as many as 85% of broodmares that have problems conceiving.

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Headshaking Problem

June 01, 2001

Q.

My horse is driving me crazy! Every time we go out to ride, he starts flipping his head. I've changed his bridle, put on gallons of fly wipe, and had his ears and eyes checked. What is his problem, and what else can I try?

Headshaking in horses has been observed by horsemen and veterinarians for nearly 100 years. Several causes have been suggested, including middle ear disorders

A. Read the Vet's Answer

Stall Walking

June 01, 2001

Q. I have a yearling Thoroughbred that constantly circumnavigates his stall. This is causing an uneven wear pattern on his hooves. How do I stop him from doing this? We do not want to put him in a standing stall, and have tried hanging a tire in the stall to no avail. He is outside when the weather is good and is quite happy there.

A. Read the Vet's Answer

Gas Colic

June 01, 2001

Q. Question and answer about gas colic in horses, including causes, symptoms/clinical signs, and recommended treatments in both adult horses and foals. Gas colic is an extremely common reason for horses to exhibit signs of abdominal pain and, fortunately, one that has a very good prognosis for survival.

A. Read the Vet's Answer

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