Stacey Oke, DVM, MSc

Stacey Oke, DVM, MSC, is a freelance medical writer based out of Canada. Her areas of interest are nutrition, supplements and osteoarthritis, and she contributes to scientific journals, magazines, and tabloid publications. When not writing, Stacey whiles away her days with her husband and two children.

Articles by Stacey Oke

Thoroughbred "Performance Genes" Further Examined in Study

The genetics behind the athletic performance of Thoroughbred racehorses has been a popular area of research in the past few years. A large-scale study was carried out recently in Japan, the results of which corroborate those of previous studies: Read More

Too Early to Establish Impact of Southern Tornadoes on Horses

Something wicked this way came--a tornado outbreak involving more than 160 individual tornadoes, touching down from Mississippi all the up the East Coast. So far, at least 200 people are reported dead, the majority in Alabama. At present, the Read More

Improve Equine Small Intestine Ultrasounds: Try Oil and Fasting (AAEP 2010)

The equine gastrointestinal system is extensive, with the small intestine measuring 70 feet in length alone. Because the small intestine coils throughout the abdomen, diagnosing a specific lesion in the small intestine is extremely challenging for Read More

Equine Pythiosis: Unsightly, Deadly, and Spreading

If your horse doesn't live in a tropical or subtropical region, you've most likely never had to worry about equine pythiosis, a relatively rare and sometimes fatal skin infection that causes tumorlike masses and ulcerated lesions in horses. But Read More

Potential Vitamin K Supplement Eyed for Equine Bone Health

A particular form of vitamin K could be a potential candidate for increasing equine bone density while decreasing breakdown. However, veterinarians caution that this is not a viable supplementation route to pursue until further research on the effect Read More

Link Between Chronic Pain and Aggression in Horses Identified

Anyone who's suffered from chronic aches and pains will likely say the ever-present irritation can put a damper on their day, possibly even making them cranky. But is the same true for horses? A group of French researchers recently completed a study Read More

Prosthetic Limbs for Horses: A Closer Look

Horses have traditionally been considered obligate four-legged animals; however, the dogma is changing. Read More

Ultrasound Exams for Diagnosing Roaring in Horses

Perhaps your horse's performance is lacking, or maybe he sounds like a freight train as he labors through work. He could be suffering from left recurrent laryngeal neuropathy, commonly known as roaring. But how can you get a diagnosis quickly and Read More

Causes of Sudden Death in Racehorses Examined

Exercise-related sudden deaths in racehorses are uncommon and "poorly understood," noted study researchers. Read More

Saliva vs. Blood for Measuring Equine Stress Levels

What do a horse's stress level and his saliva have in common? Belgian scientists have found testing the former can measure the latter, and they said this saliva assay could become the test of choice for measuring horses' stress. "Cortisol levels are Read More

Limb Amputations in Horses a Valid Consideration (AAEP 2010)

Veterinary students are often taught that dogs are three-legged animals with a spare. It might be surprising to some that the same adage is a suitable description for horses, too. "In horses where conditions exist that prevent the use of traditional Read More

Ultrasound Helpful For Diagnosing Infected Joints in Horses (AAEP 2010)

When a veterinarian suspects a horse's joint is infected, but it is not practical or feasible to obtain a joint fluid sample, he or she should consider using ultrasound to image the joint. Alex Young, BVSc, of the University of California, Davis' Read More

Horse Sedation with an Oral Gel (AAEP 2010)

We've all heard about or witnessed horses that simply refuse to be restrained long enough for the veterinarian to administer a much-needed intravenous sedative. Authors of a recent study suggest that a sedative-containing gel might be just what the Read More

Japan's Nuclear Troubles: What is Radiation's Effect on Horses?

High doses of radiation can lead to radiation sickness in humans, but what types of effects might they have on horses? In the wake of the fourth explosion at the Fukushima nuclear power plant following the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, concerns Read More

Side Effects of Sedative Reversal Agents in Horses (AAEP 2010)

The idea of being able to "unsedate" or "reverse" a sedated horse after minor procedures is a great one, but veterinarians must select their cases carefully and be vigilant about using these drugs properly. Read More

Horse Colic Prognosis Using Blood Lactate Levels (AAEP 2010)

Monitoring lactate levels in samples of peritoneal fluid, the fluid surrounding and lubricating the abdominal organs, can help a veterinarian predict which colicky horses require surgery. John G. Peloso, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVS, presented a study on Read More

Treating Severe Forelimb Pain With a Continuous Nerve Blockade (AAEP 2010)

Veterinarians can reduce a horse's severe forelimb pain by administering a continuous, low-dose infusion of the local anesthetic bupivacaine, but this method is not suitable for every case, according to researchers from Cornell University's College Read More

Colic Surgery and Intestinal Lubricants (AAEP 2010)

Colicky horses that undergo exploratory surgery and are ultimately diagnosed with an ileal impaction appear to benefit from a single injection of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) into the ileum to resolve the problem, according to veterinarians from Read More

Comparing Bute and Firocoxib Safety (AAEP 2010)

The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) firocoxib had fewer side effects than phenylbutazone in horses after 42 days of treatment, according to scientists from Merial Limited who presented comparative research results at the 2010 Convention Read More

Insulin Doping in Horses: New Test Developed

A test able to detect even the smallest amount of insulin in horse urine has recently been developed to aid in the detection of insulin doping in racehorses, according to a group of researchers from the Hong Kong Jockey Club's Racing laboratory.
Read More

Heart Disease Blood Test in Horses: Effective and Useful (AAEP 2010)

If a veterinarian suspects heart disease in a horse, running a cardiac troponin I (cTnI) blood test can expedite a diagnosis, according to a team of Cornell University veterinary researchers. Cardiac troponin I is an excellent marker for injury to Read More

R. Equi: The Hunt for New Antibiotics Continues (AAEP 2010)

It isn't for lack of effort that the equine industry still doesn't have new options for treating Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals. "To date, alternatives to macrolides for effective treatment of R. equi pneumonia in foals have not been identified Read More

Digital Photos Assist in Treating the Equine Eye (AAEP 2010)

Ann E. Dwyer, DVM, says that the most basic point-and-shoot digital camera is an "invaluable tool for documenting and following a variety of ophthalmic problems such as those affecting the orbit, eyelids, cornea, iris, and lens of the equine eye." Read More

Colic Surgery Closures: Sutures or Staples? (AAEP 2010)

Customarily, veterinarians close the intestinal wall following colic surgery in horses using either sutures or staples. But which is best? According to Julie Rosser, DVM, it's a tie: Staples are just as effective as the traditional method of Read More

Avoiding Respiratory Problems in Anesthetized Horses (AAEP 2010)

Letting 'sleeping horses lie' may not be the best thing when they're anesthetized, according to John A. E. Hubbell, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVA (anesthesiology), professor of veterinary anesthesiology in the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences at The Read More