Stacey Oke, DVM, MSc

Stacey Oke, MSc, DVM, is a practicing veterinarian and freelance medical writer and editor. She is interested in both large and small animals, as well as complementary and alternative medicine. Since 2005, she's worked as a research consultant for nutritional supplement companies, assisted physicians and veterinarians in publishing research articles and textbooks, and written for a number of educational magazines and websites.

Articles by Stacey Oke

Monitoring Horses after Plasma Transfusions Recommended

Plasma is widely administered to horses and foals for a variety of reasons, such as a critical illness, failure of passive transfer in foals, or prophylaxis against Rhodococcus equi. Read More

TheHorse.com en Español: Aparición de Huevecillos de Pequeños Estróngilos

This is one of a series of articles translated as part of our partnership with A Caballo, an equine publication based in Mexico, and Jorge Murga, DVM. Keep an eye Read More

Customize Bits and Bridles to Minimize Oral Ulcers

"Oral ulcers and abrasions on the lips, cheeks, and tongue of horses are very common and are primarily caused by trauma," Wattle said. "For example, nose bands pressing against the horse's cheeks and badly fitting bits are both thought to be common Read More

Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM): Debunking the Myths

Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a bit like a rock star: highly Googled, morbidly fascinating, yet oftentimes completely misunderstood.

Read More

Study: Hylauronan Dressing Doesn't Aid Distal Limb Wound Healing

Results of a clinical study showed that distal limb wounds treated with a dressing containing esterified hyaluronic acid (hyaluronan) showed no improvement in healing as compared to untreated wounds.

To evaluate the effect of an Read More

Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for Wound Management: Study

Managing wounds located on the distal (lower) limbs of horses is by far one of the most frustrating and time-consuming jobs of an equine practitioner. Aggressive research efforts have explored tactics to minimize the formation of excessive scar tissu Read More

Metformin a Therapy in Progress for Equine Insulin Resistance

Oregon State Researchers suggest that a low bioavailability and a rapid rate of elimination of the drug metformin might explain the "varied reports of clinical success" for improving insulin sensitivity in horses.

Metformin is an oral Read More

UK Incidence of Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy Reported

Not only is polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) a common and important muscular disorder in various horse breeds in the United States, but according to a recent research report, it is also a common diagnosis in horses in the Unite Read More

New Cloning Technology Might Mean Improved EHV Vaccines

Japanese researchers recently reported the use of the technology "Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) cloning," which enabled the scientists to clone the entire genome of a virus in bacteria.

The technique could be used to mas Read More

Dose of Caution Recommended with Some Herbal Supplements

They're sold over the counter, on the Internet, and in tack shops, so herbal supplements must be safe for your horse, right? Not necessarily, report researchers from Norway and China. According to this group of scientists, some commonly use Read More

Esophageal Problem Hereditary in Friesians?

Megaesophagus, a chronic dilation of the esophagus, appears to occur at an atypically high rate in Friesians. Read More

Will the Worms Win? Part 2: Resistance

Managing internal parasites in the face of dewormer resistance.

Anthelmintic resistance is a growing problem the world over. While we might not see "super worms" ravaging our equine companions, there is a pressing need to Read More

Consider Temporal Nerve Problem in Neurologic Horse Diagnosis

When presented with a horse demonstrating facial nerve paralysis and/or a head tilt, neurologists say veterinarians should consider temporohyoid osteoarthropathy, a disorder of the hyoid apparatus (voice box) and associated structures. Although Read More

Stem Cell Therapy Effective for Tendonitis in Cornell Study

Horses faced with career-ending tendon injuries might possess the power to heal themselves.

According to Alan J. Nixon, BVSc, MS, Dipl. ACVS, and colleagues from Cornell University, veterinarians might be able to effectively treat horses Read More

Keeping Glanders at Bay

Considering that North America has been free of glanders for more than 50 years, many practitioners and horse owners are, understandably, not familiar with the clinical signs of the disease. As evidenced by the recent importation of Read More

Equine Sarcoid Treatment Recommendations, WEVA 2008

The equine sarcoid is an unpredictable skin tumor capable of wreaking havoc on a horse's body. While not technically a "cancer" (neoplasm) in the pathological sense, sarcoids are often considered as such because they are a potential career- and Read More

Keeping Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis 'Foreign'

Most horse owners are familiar with Eastern and Western equine encephalomyelitis, if only through the statement they receive from their veterinarian following their horses' annual vaccinations. But there's another "EE" that, while Read More

Study: Starch Limitation Key for Short-Term Blood Sugar Control

To better control blood sugar and insulin levels, horse owners are encouraged to limit starch intake in their animals, rather than only supplementing their horse's diet with fats, recommends Ingrid Vervuert, DrMedVet, PhD, and Read More

Tips on Examining the Equine Eye

In general, overt pathology is easy to identify because of the ease by which the equine eye can be examined. The largest challenge for general practitioners is determining the significance of subtle variations in normal eyes and recognizing the mild Read More

Treadmill Use Aids Equine Performance Evaluation

Methods for evaluating the ubiquitous presentation of "poor performance" in equine athletes have improved in the past few years, enabling veterinarians to better explain why a horse might not be performing at its previous level, explained David Read More

Toxin Test Might Identify Horses with Diarrhea that Could be Debilitating

Early identification of a toxin produced by the diarrhea-causing bacterium Clostridium difficile, in the feces of horses with diarrhea might help identify which horses are at risk for developing serious disease, report Read More

Shock Wave: No Analgesic Effect Found in Study

Shock wave therapy is widely used to treat proximal suspensory desmitis by inducing the release of cytokines. Read More

Shock Wave a Valid Treatment for Osteoarthritis, Study Finds

Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) significantly reduces lameness in horses with osteoarthritis, but it does not alter the course of disease, reported researchers from the Equine Orthopaedic Research Center at Colorado State University. Read More

Vaccinate Against Equine Flu to Minimize Spread of Disease

Equine influenza is a common respiratory infection in horses caused by the equine influenza A type-2 virus. While influenza is not particularly harmful to affected horses (i.e., it has a very low mortality rate), it is associated with explosive Read More

Telemetric Endoscopy Could Cure Upper Airway Diagnostic Woes

Upper airway disorders, such as dorsal displacement of the soft palate or dynamic collapse of the upper respiratory tract, can be challenging to diagnose in performance horses. Nonetheless, these are important causes of poor Read More