Stacey Oke, DVM, MSc

Stacey Oke, MSc, DVM, is a practicing veterinarian and freelance medical writer and editor. She is interested in both large and small animals, as well as complementary and alternative medicine. Since 2005, she's worked as a research consultant for nutritional supplement companies, assisted physicians and veterinarians in publishing research articles and textbooks, and written for a number of educational magazines and websites.

Articles by Stacey Oke

Treating Seasonal Headshaking with Eye Drops

Horses that shake their heads in an unexpected, intermittent, potentially violent, and apparently involuntary way are not only frustrating, but widely deemed unsafe for the rider or handler.

Horses suffering from seasonal headshaking can Read More

Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy (PSSM): Search for Underlying Causes Continues

Despite having recently identified a genetic defect that results in polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) in many horses, the underlying cause of PSSM remains to be determined in others. Read More

Emerging Pathogen Lawsonia Detailed in New Study

Lawsonia intracellularis is known to be the causative agent of proliferative enteropathy (a spreading disease involving the intestines) in horses and is an important emerging Read More

ACVIM Conference Highlights

Among the hot topics this year were nutritional supplements, infectious disease, and metabolism problems.

What do nutritional supplements, infectious diseases, and snake bites have in common? All were considered "hot Read More

Good as Gold? More Research Supports Glucosamine

Questions and concerns abound surrounding the use of oral joint health supplements for horses with osteoarthritis, and so researchers continue their quest to determine if and how glucosamine works to decrease pain and inflammation caused by Read More

Bone Marrow Stem Cell Therapy Effective in Equine Tendon Study

While not nearly as controversial as research involving embryonic-derived stem cells in human medicine, the veterinary world is certainly divided on the clinical benefits, or lack thereof, of bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for tendon Read More

Equine Anhidrosis: Researcher's 'Sweat Equity' Led to New Test

Florida researcher Robert MacKay, BVSc, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, professor in the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences at the University of Florida, has developed a new means of assessing and quantifying quantifying clinical signs of horses tha Read More

More Evidence Supports Glucosamine for Joint Disease

Skeptics continue to doubt the effects of glucosamine and other oral joint health supplements, but mounting research seems to be proving, one step at a time, that there is more to these products than meets the eye.

Canadian researchers, led Read More

Genetic Mutation for Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy Widespread

Veterinary researchers from the University of Minnesota have identified a gene potentially responsible for polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) in Quarter Horses and, in doing so, they uncovered a number of research leads to pursue. In a Read More

Safety of Nutritional Supplements for Horses Unknown, Researchers Say

Just because a supplement comes in fancy packaging with a tamper-resistant foil seal and promises of efficacy does not necessarily mean that it is safe for your horse.

According to the Committee on Examining the Safety of Dietary Read More

Canadian Researchers Focus on Racehorse Safety

Since the loss of Barbaro and Eight Belles, NBC's Roundtable on the horseracing industry at the 2008 Preakness Stakes, and the congressional hearing in June 2008, researchers are highlighting their efforts to improve racehorse safety and Canadian Read More

New Species of Bacteria Common in Foals

A recent addition to a family of bacteria generally associated with human stomach problems could play a part in causing intestinal upset in foals, say Belgian researchers who have found that a disproportionate amount of foals have the bug in their Read More

Joint Injections and Cartilage Health: More Fuel for the Fire

The potential impact of intra-articular medications on the health of cartilage in joints has been debated for decades. Adding fuel to the fire is the recent finding that two common joint medications not only support cartilage cells, they also Read More

Equid Emotions and Laterality: Is there a Connection?

Does your horse give "dirty" looks? Rather than trying to read his expression, you might be able get some clues about how your horse really feels about objects by paying attention to which eye he uses to observe them. French Read More

Joint Injections: Pros and Cons

Joint injections can safely localize lameness or medicate a joint, but they might cause complications. Read More

Shedding Light on Night Blindness in Appaloosas

Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) in Appaloosas has been linked to the leopard complex spotting in these horses. But how are these two apparently independent genetic Read More

Aligning Training with Horse Behavior

Along with researching drugs, treatments, and techniques to keep your horse healthy, equine researchers are discovering how handling and training methods can be brought more in line with horses' natural behaviors and instincts for a more harmonious Read More

Valacyclovir Dosage Recommendations for EHV Released

Oklahoma researchers interested in limiting equine herpesvirus (EHV) disease outbreaks have established specific dosing recommendations for the antiviral agent valacyclovir. The drug appears to be effective in preventing or minimizing clinical Read More

Aging Horses by their…Telomeres?

To guess a horse's age you can look at his teeth ... or the length of his telomeres and his immune system function, according to researchers with the University of Kentucky's Gluck Equine Research Center.

Scientists studying the Read More

Focus on Equine Genetics: the Ol' Gray Mare

For more than 100 years, equine researchers have been examining why gray horses that are losing hair pigmentation are often concurrently affected by melanomas—tumors characterized by a massive production of the pigment melanin.

According Read More

Splitting Hairs: New Drug Test Uses Hair, Not Urine

German researcher Patricia Anielski is raising the bar when it comes to drug testing in horses. Anabolic steroids such as testosterone propionate can be detected in hair samples to identify current and even previous abuse of the substance. Read More

Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Tendon Injuries: The Fat is Phat

Stem cell research has shown that adult stem cells can be safely and easily harvested from fat deposits in a horse and used to treat a variety of musculoskeletal diseases. These cells are capable of becoming bone, muscle, cartilage, or tendon cells. Read More

Learning Lawsonia's Habits: High Exposure Rates, Low Morbidity

It appears most young foals born on farms with endemic Lawsonia intracellularis could be protected from equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE), a spreading intestinal disease caused by the bacterium, provided they ingest colostrum containing Read More

Sarcoid-Causing Virus Harbored by Circulating Blood Cells

Aggressive research efforts to discover how the sarcoid-causing bovine papillomaviruses (BPV) are spread either within or between horses have resulted in the identification of BPV genetic material (DNA) in circulating blood cells. Read More

Experimental Drug Research Provides Promising Results

Endotoxemia. Septic shock. Intestinal ischemia. What do all these ailments have in common? Based on recent studies, some researchers think an investigational drug called pirfenidone might be a treatment option for all three.

"Pirfenidone, Read More