Nancy S. Loving, DVM

Nancy S. Loving, DVM, owns Loving Equine Clinic in Boulder, Colo., and has a special interest in managing the care of sport horses. Her recent book, All Horse Systems Go, is a comprehensive veterinary care and conditioning resource in full color that covers all facets of horse care (available at Shop.TheHorse.com or by calling 800/582-5604). She has also authored the books Go the Distance as a resource for endurance horse owners, Conformation and Performance, and First Aid for Horse and Rider in addition to many veterinary articles for both horse owner and professional audiences.

Articles by Nancy Loving

Testing an Anti-Inflammatory Dietary Nutraceutical (AAEP 2008)

Horse owners commonly add nutraceuticals to their horses' diets to treat or prevent joint disease, but most products have no research data supporting their effectiveness. Read More

Acute Laminitis: Are Drugs Effective? (AAEP 2008)

In general, controlled studies do not exist regarding the efficacy of various treatments for laminitis, and some therapies have additional risks beyond their failure to improve the situation. Read More

Acquired Scoliosis in Equids, AAEP 2008

Scoliosis, a curvature of the spine, is most often attributed to congenital vertebral malformations, possibly associated with malposition of the fetus in the uterus. However, researchers have linked cases of acquired scoliosis presented at Cornell Read More

Emergency Care at Endurance Events

Endurance rides are often held in wilderness areas without good road access, posing a challenge when trying to reach a horse in distress. A Treatment Veterinarian should be equipped with sufficient horsepower (vehicle, ATV, or horse) to reach a horse Read More

Equine Bone Fragility Syndrome, AAEP 2008

Women aren't the only ones suffering from decreased bone density and bone mass loss--horses in Central California have experienced a systemic osteoporotic disorder. Equine bone fragility syndrome, a systemic osteoporotic (characterized by a decrease Read More

Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy (PSSM): A Genetic Diagnosis, AAEP 2008

Polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) is a metabolic muscle problem found in at least 20 breeds, including Quarter Horses, Paints, Appaloosas, and drafts. An affected horse suffers bouts of exertional rhabdomyolysis (tying-up), muscle tremors Read More

Sleep and Sleep Disorders in Horses, AAEP 2008

Unlike humans, adult horses average only about three to five hours of sleep per day, with sleep events occurring intermittently throughout the day and night, with most occurring at night. Lack of sleep or a sleep disorder has the potential to impact Read More

Dusty Air and Respiratory Problems

In addition to the risks viruses and bacteria pose to the horse, environmental exposure to particulates dispersed from feed, bedding, footing materials, and other sources (such as diesel exhaust) all can lead to IAD. Even small increases in aerodynam Read More

Emergency Preparedness for Eventing

In general, event horses are subject to tendon and ligament injuries, lacerations and trauma, hyperthermia (overheating), hypoxia (low oxygen), tying-up, electrolyte depletion, exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage, and other speed-related problems. Read More

Aortic-Iliac Thrombosis, Diagnosis and Treatment

He noted aortic-iliac thrombosis (TAI) can cause lameness, but the incidence in the United States is low. Damage to, and thrombus (blood clot) in, these large blood vessels might be caused by internal parasites. Read More

Emergency Veterinary Care at Horse Shows

Most horse show emergencies are able to be cared for on-site, but if a crisis develops, the horse should be stabilized and transported to a full-care facility, according to Rick Mitchell, DVM, of Fairfield Equine Associates in Newtown, Conn. Read More

Disease Risks at Shows and Events

Common sense and careful attention to detail can help reduce the risk of disease in your traveling horse.

Just as when a bunch of people are confined to a relatively small space, such as in an office or airplane, when Read More

Medication Thresholds

A drug's withdrawal time indicates a suggested timeline by which the last dose can be administered before an event to avoid blood or urine test levels that exceed the allowable regulatory threshold. Using these thresholds encourages standardization Read More

Neurology is Not a Euphemism for Necropsy

Reed believes that future goals for managing neurologic disease in horses should be to decrease mortality and improve outcomes. This would be best achieved by developing improved diagnostic tools to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment Read More

Tart Cherry Juice May Reduce Muscle Damage

A recent human study has found that tart cherry juice blend (TCJB) had beneficial effects on exercising muscle. The objective was to determine if TCJB can lessen exercise-induced muscle damage in horses, as measured by serum enzymatic markers. Read More

Barn Fires: Strategies to Prevent and Respond (AAEP 2008)

Barn fires are the No. 1 local emergency that affects everyone from horse owners to veterinarians, and property owners to the horses themselves. Barn fires kill more horses annually than any other type of nonmedical emergency. Read More

Questions to Ask Before Breeding a Mare

Thinking of breeding your mare this spring? The recent outbreak of contagious equine metritis (CEM, which is caused by bacterium Taylorella equigenitalis) in the United States and the previous outbreak of equine viral arteritis (EVA) have Read More

Safely Increasing Weight in Emaciated Horses

Rehabilitating emaciated horses to nutritional health is a challenge--there's a fine line between not getting results and risking the horse's health by introducing too much, too soon. Read More

Vaccination Yearly Planner

Immunizations are the cornerstone of disease prevention if given appropriately and in a timely manner. Read More

Disease Control Yearly Planner

Guard against diseases on your farm year-round by employing these seasonal tips

For a horse to perform to his utmost capacity, he must be healthy and sound throughout the year. The smallest details of farm management often Read More

Measuring the Physiologic Response to Nutrition

Whether for weight gain or loss, speed or shine, nearly everything we offer our horses is given to bring about a desired effect. Stacie Appleton, PhD, and Mike Jerina, BS, presented a demonstration on "Measuring the Physiologic Read More

Beyond the Feed Tag: Horse Feed Ingredients, Quality and Safety Issues

The tag on every animal feed product is labeled with information required by the FDA, with ingredients listed in descending order of predominance--from most to least inclusion. "However, this is not always enforced and there is no guarantee that list Read More

Forage Options for Special Needs Horses

Horses are often fed diets that also contain high levels of grains and supplements to maximise growth or productivity. Katie Young, PhD, consulting equine nutritionist for Purina Mills, presented information on forage options for horses with commonly Read More

Thrush Diagnosis and Treatment

Most cases of thrush occur in inactive horses that live in stalls. Unfortunately, this describes a huge percentage of horses in the United States, since over the past few decades horses have become 'apartment dwellers.' Read More

Feeding to Lessen Inflammation

At the Purina Equine Veterinary Conference, held Oct. 17-19 in St. Louis, Mo., Karen Davison, PhD, manager of Equine Technical Services for the Horse Business Group of Purina Mills discussed managing inflammation and oxidative stress in horses Read More