Cornell Vet Students Earn TERF Scholarships

Jesse Tyma and Daniel Jackson, both students at Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, have been awarded scholarships by the Thoroughbred Education and Research Foundation (TERF).

“The Thoroughbred Education and Research Foundation Scholarships are making a meaningful impact on talented students who will contribute a great deal to the veterinary profession across the span of their careers,” said Katherine M. Edmondson, PhD, assistant dean for learning and instruction at Cornell’s veterinary college. “The scholarships provide invaluable financial assistance to our students and encouragement to pursue opportunities that might otherwise be out of reach. We are very grateful to the foundation for their support.”

Designed to assist students of promise to prepare for careers in equine medicine and surgery, the scholarships help the foundation realize its mission to support and promote equine education and research.

“The scholarship program is one of our most rewarding initiatives,” said James Orsini, DVM, Dipl. ACVS, associate professor of surgery and director of the Laminitis Institute at the University of Pennsylvania. “Offering scholarships to Cornell students assures us that the recipients are the best trained and prepared for equine primary care or postgraduate training upon graduation. With a strong foundation in equine medicine, Cornell’s students graduate with a financial head start that allows them to direct their focus and passion on their careers that benefit horses. The scholarship program is key to our mission. Our goal is to support as many worthy students as possible in veterinary medicine across the United States, and our expectation is to do more.”

Jackson, a member of the college’s class of 2013, has focused his attention in the areas of large animal medicine, field service, and epidemiological research. To strengthen his clinical skills training, he logged more than 1,000 hours as a veterinary student technician in Cornell’s Equine and Farm Animal Hospitals. After graduation, he hopes to continue these interests through a combination of clinical practice and research with a focus on agricultural animal disease and ecosystem health.

“Dedicated mentors have been central to my professional development--from turning to biology during my undergraduate career through formative veterinary work in clinics and field research,” said Jackson. “In my first year of clinical practice, I look forward to continuing my education and providing the best service I can to clients.”

Tyma, a member of the class of 2014 who will begin an internship at Rhinebeck Equine, in Rhinebeck, N.Y., after graduation, is interested in a number of specialty areas within equine medicine: emergency surgery, sports medicine, diagnostic imaging, ophthalmology, neurology and complementary medicine. Tyma aspires to develop innovative rehabilitative therapies to help treat horses suffering from traumatic performance injuries and pictures her future as an associate and eventual partner at a private equine referral practice that offers a variety of diagnostic and imaging modalities and numerous specialty services.

“My work on ‘colic crew’ as an emergency technician in the large animal hospital has allowed me to intimately observe procedures on numerous large animal species and learn about surgical anatomy from the surgeons and students,” Tyma said. “This experience reaffirmed a personal interest in equine surgery. Likewise, my work at the Equine Performance Testing Clinic also bolstered my interest in sports medicine.”

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