UK Graduate Student Spotlight: Juliana Roberta Campos

Name: Juliana Roberta Campos
From: Brazil
Degrees and institute where received: DVM - Sao Paulo State University, Brazil

Being a huge fan of both horses and equine research, graduate student Juliana Roberta Campos said being a huge fan of horses and equine research made her choice to seek a masters' degree at the University of Kentucky Gluck Equine Research Center an easy one.

Campos' research focuses on equine viral arteritis, a venereal contagious disease of equids. The virus is known for establishing persistence in the reproductive tract of 30-70% of infected stallions, which can become carriers and shed the virus in their semen for a variable period of time, Campos said.

"The focus of my research is to study the mechanisms of establishments of Equine Arteritis Virus (EAV) persistent infection in the stallion and to see the effect of the virus on semen quality during acute infection," she said. "If we have a diagnostic tool, which can distinguish between carrier, and non-carrier stallions before infection with the virus, we could give more attention to those stallions that are predisposed to become carriers in research programs for the control of the disease."

Currently, there isn't a national program available for the prevention and control of EVA or any requirement regarding EVA for importing horses into the United States. This leaves the horse population in the U.S. very vulnerable to an outbreak of EVA, that may cause a great economic loss in the equine industry, Campos said.

Campos' anticipated graduation is in fall 2012. She hopes to pursue a PhD thereafter.

Shaila Sigsgaard is a contributing writer for the Bluegrass Equine Digest.

Want more articles like this? Sign up for the Bluegrass Equine Digest e-Newsletter.

More information on Gluck Equine Research Center and UK Ag Equine Programs.

Stay on top of the most recent Horse Health news with FREE weekly newsletters from Learn More

Free Newsletters

Sign up for the latest in:

From our partners