Seventeen equines have tested positive for Equine Infectious Anemia in Wayne County since Sept. 18, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA). Fourteen of the equines have been destroyed, and the other three are quarantined.

PDA is investigating all leads to identify, quarantine, and test Pennsylvania equines which have been exposed to the known positive equines, which all trace back to two Wayne County camp herds. All equines on those two premises are test negative and under quarantine.

PDA investigations have resulted in the quarantine of the entire equine population on seven farms. Exposed equines on an additional 34 farms are under quarantine. Officials and regulatory authorities in the states of New York, Maryland, and Ohio are being informed of exposed equines which are now in those states.

EIA is a viral disease which can be detected by a blood test called the Coggins test. It is incurable, and is spread from equine to equine through contaminated blood. Biting flies and improper use of equipment and needles (by man) are the most common vectors for the spread of EIA. A horse diagnosed with EIA is a carrier for life and by law must either be euthanized or held in a quarantine facility.

Seventeen equines have tested positive for Equine Infectious Anemia in Wayne County since Sept. 18, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA). Fourteen of the equines have been destroyed, and the other three are quarantined.

PDA is investigating all leads to identify, quarantine, and test Pennsylvania equines which have been exposed to the known positive equines, which all trace back to two Wayne County camp herds. All equines on those two premises are test negative and under quarantine.

PDA investigations have resulted in the quarantine of the entire equine population on seven farms. Exposed equines on an additional 34 farms are under quarantine. Officials and regulatory authorities in the states of New York, Maryland, and Ohio are being informed of exposed equines which are now in those states.

EIA is a viral disease which can be detected by a blood test called the Coggins test. It is incurable, and is spread from equine to equine through contaminated blood. Biting flies and improper use of equipment and needles (by man) are the most common vectors for the spread of EIA. A horse diagnosed with EIA is a carrier for life and by law must either be euthanized or held in a quarantine facility.

About the Author

Stephanie L. Church, Editor-in-Chief

Stephanie L. Church, Editor-in-Chief, received a B.A. in Journalism and Equestrian Studies from Averett College in Danville, Virginia. A Pony Club and 4-H graduate, her background is in eventing, and she is schooling her recently retired Thoroughbred racehorse, Happy, toward a career in that discipline. She also enjoys traveling, photography, cycling, and cooking in her free time.

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