Digestive System

Article

Exercise and Ulcers: Is it the Norm?

April 01, 2003

University of Florida (UF) research has shown that any exercise above a walk could force acidic gastric juices up into sensitive areas of the equine stomach, which could be why ulcers develop or worsen in horses in training (affecting more than... Read More

Article

Gastroduodenoscopy: What to Expect

February 25, 2003

Veterinarians have a variety of ways to look inside your horse to see what might be bothering him. One of these methods is gastroduodenoscopy, which allows the veterinarian to see the interior of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum with the use... Read More

Article

The Adaptive Equine Stomach

December 01, 2002

A study at the Island Whirl Equine Colic Research Laboratory at the University of Florida has determined that the horse's stomach can adapt to meals of various sizes and compositions, giving researchers a better understanding of how the normal... Read More

Article

The Body's Building Blocks

November 01, 2002

Like a structure made of tinker toys, protein is composed of smaller pieces--the amino acids. These can be rearranged to form the different types of protein-based tissues in the body. Protein is one of the basic nutrient elements of the equine... Read More

Article

Dental Correction and Feed Digestibility

March 13, 2002

Equine dental abnormalities are among the top five most common medical problems encountered by equine veterinarians. Clinical evidence has shown that horses with severe tooth hooks and points that were corrected gained weight... Read More

Article

Endotoxemia and Gastrointestinal Disease

February 01, 2002

Endotoxemia is one of the most commonly encountered life-threatening conditions in horses with gastrointestinal disease. It is, by nature, a very disappointing and frustrating disease to encounter, and is the leading cause of death in adult horses... Read More

Article

Clostridium perfringens Genome Sequenced

January 24, 2002

Japanese scientists recently announced that they have sequenced the genome of Clostridium perfringens. The organism can cause diarrhea, scours, and other intestinal problems in horses. Clostridia are normally found in various environments... Read More

Article

Equine Digestive Physiology

January 09, 2002

An understanding of the horses' digestive tract, where feedstuffs are digested and how that impacts the end products of digestion, is necessary to help the horse meet these challenges. The digestive tract of the horse is divided into two sections... Read More

Article

"Glass Horse" Unveiled at Veterinary Convention

January 03, 2002

Hundreds of veterinarians waited patiently in line in San Diego, Calif., on the afternoon of Nov. 26—and not at the airport. They were waiting in the American Association of Equine Practitioners convention trade show to purchase a copy of “The... Read More

Article

The Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract

October 16, 2001

Then there is the matter of the large colon, with its sacculated construction that seems made to order for twisting or strangulating when the pouches become distended by gas during a bout with colic.

There is also the matter of length. If... Read More

Article

Probiotics and Digestive Aids: Microbes to the Rescue

October 05, 2001

While the horse receives the bulk of the nutrients as his food is broken down, he's not the only one who benefits; the microbes take their share and thus maintain their populations. Their presence is essential to the horse, who could not digest fiber... Read More

Article

Digestion From Start To Finish

August 01, 2001

Although it is not necessary for you to become bogged down in the intricacies of equine digestive physiology, a basic understanding of how the horse digests feed is necessary for the selection of appropriate diets and feeding practices.... Read More

Article

Moore to Present State-of-the-Art Lecture at 2001 Annual Convention

June 15, 2001

James N. Moore, DVM, PhD, one of the world's foremost authorities on equine gastrointestinal disease, will present the Frank J. Milne State-of-the-Art Lecture at the American Association of Equine Practitioners' (AAEP) 47th Annual Convention in... Read More

Article

Choke (Esophageal Obstruction)

April 01, 2001

The word choke for me conjures up images of someone hovering over a table, unable to talk or breathe because a piece of food has lodged in their trachea or windpipe--fortunately, the Heimlich maneuver usually rectifies the situation. Choke is... Read More

Article

AAEP Convention Preview: State-of-the-Art Topic

January 01, 2001

Milne Lecture Features 3-D Anatomy Software

The Frank J. Milne Lecture is named for AAEP past president and distinguished life member Frank J. Milne. Each year, the lecture focuses on subjects and techniques considered... Read More

Article

Fat Burning

November 01, 2000

For the most part, the word "fat" has bad connotations in our society today--fat often is used to describe an overweight or obese state. When we think of dietary fat and the proportion of calories in our diet that is derived from various sources... Read More

Article

Your Horse's Gastrointestinal Health: A Contented Colon

January 01, 2000

If you have a veterinary textbook somewhere on your shelves, chances are you've seen one of those photos of a sick horse's innards-miles and miles of wet, purplish loops of intestine, spilling out in all directions. The poor equine posing for... Read More

Article

Horses and Humans: Eating For Two

November 01, 1999

Equines are obligate herbivores, meaning they are designed to eat plants and only plants; they're not equipped to eat or to digest animal flesh. Humans, on the other hand, are true omnivores, meaning we'll eat practically anything. ... Read More

Article

Feeding Horses Cattle Feed: Just Ruminating

September 01, 1999

On the surface, cattle feeds might look like an appropriate choice for your horses, but nutritionally, there are a number of important differences. They have major digestive and metabolic differences that make their dietary needs quite diverse.... Read More

Article

Pasture Paranoia: Laminitis Prevention

February 01, 1999

Lush pasture is the arch enemy of horses susceptible to laminitis and founder. ... Read More

Article

Feeding the High-Octane Horse

August 01, 1998

But because forages are not high-energy feeds, the athletic horse's diet needs to be supplemented in order to provide enough energy for him to perform at peak capacity. Traditionally, this is done by feeding grains, which are rich in carbohydrates... Read More

Article

The Power of Protein

November 01, 1997

Of all the components of your horse's diet, protein is probably the most misunderstood. ... Read More