Foal Care

Article

Rhodococcus equi: Genetic Variability and its Clinical Implications

February 12, 2004

If there are any two words that can cause a foaling operation's manager to shudder, they are probably "Rhodococcus equi," since the bacterium is considered the most common cause of severe pneumonia in foals. ... Read More

Article

Testing for Failure of Passive Transfer

February 03, 2004

When a newborn foal, for whatever reason, fails to obtain the antibodies he needs from his mother in his first hours of life, this often results in a very sick or even dead foal from septicemia. Quick identification of the problem (failure of passive... Read More

Article

Feeding Orphan Foals

February 01, 2004

Orphan--the name itself evokes sadness and sympathy. A baby without a mother, in this case a foal. Whether it occurs through the death of the mare, or just that the mare cannot produce milk or will not take care of her foal, it all leads to one... Read More

Article

R. equi on Breeding Farms

February 01, 2004

Rhodococcus equi is an organism that lives in soil, requiring warmth and nutrients found in horse manure to grow and spread among equine populations. It is the most common cause of pneumonia in foals one to four months of age, bringing... Read More

Article

Jump-Starting the Dummy Foal

January 31, 2004

The term "dummy foal" is being used less and less. A more accurate term for the foal exhibiting behavioral or neurologic abnormalities that are not related to infectious or toxic conditions, congenital or developmental abnormalities, or metabolic dis... Read More

Article

Foal Care From Birth to 30 Days (AAEP 2003)

January 31, 2004

Foal care from the first few hours of life to one month can be critical in the overall health and welfare of the newborn foal.... Read More

Article

Abdominal Pain in Foals (AAEP 2003)

January 31, 2004

Abdominal pain in the foal can have many different causes, making it difficult to diagnose a cause. However, with knowledge of the different causes, a proper physical exam, the use of diagnostic tools, and common sense, a veterinarian can pinpoint a ... Read More

Article

When a Foal Needs Surgery (AAEP 2003)

January 31, 2004

If your new foal develops a disease or medical problem that requires surgery, then time is of the essence. In his AAEP Convention presentation "Surgical Disease of the Neonate," Rolf Embertson, DVM, Dipl. ACVS, of Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital... Read More

Article

Septic Arthritis and Racing Potential

January 01, 2004

Septic arthritis in a Thoroughbred foal significantly reduces the likelihood the animal will race, according to a study conducted by researchers at the University of Glasgow in Scotland and veterinarians with Rossdale and Partners in England. Th... Read More

Article

Equine Placenta and Possible Problems

December 08, 2003

A two-day exclusive gathering of leading reproductive researchers and practitioners from around the world convened at the Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center in Lexington, Ky., Dec. 5-6, to discuss the equine placenta. From the evolutionary... Read More

Article

Ivermectin/Praziquantel Safe For Pregnant Mares And Foals

December 01, 2003

A recent study completed by French and Brazilian veterinarians showed that administration of ivermectin/praziquantel paste, a common equine dewormer combination, is safe for pregnant mares and their foals. Dewormers of this type have not yet bee... Read More

Article

Newborns Out of Breath

November 01, 2003

I'd like to know more about foals who after being delivered, dried, and rubbed well, quit breathing in 10-20 minutes. We have done resuscitation by blowing into their nostrils and pumping their rib cages, and have rubbed them vigorously. The... Read More

Article

Diagnosing Septic Foals

November 01, 2003

No one test can reliably diagnose septicemia (systemic infection) in a foal. The clinician must wait for the results of blood cultures, which can take days. However, preliminary studies of a blood protein called serum amyloid A (SAA) have shown... Read More

Article

High-Tech Horse Raising

August 13, 2003

Tracking the growth of young horses is going high-tech with a computer program called Gro-Trac. Developed by Kentucky Equine Research (KER), the program allows breeders to compare the growth rates of horses on their farms to others of the same... Read More

Article

Foal Temperature Regulation

August 01, 2003

Q: I recently clipped my 1-week-old Norwegian Fjord colt as he was having a hard time with the 95-97-degree heat here in Florida. We at first thought he was really sick with a fever, but after ruling out everything else we (me,... Read More

Article

Wetting the Bed

July 01, 2003

I just started raising a few minis. This year I have a colt which was born with a urinary problem. He keeps dripping urine, not every minute but especially when he lies down. His genital area will be wet, just like kids when they sleep and... Read More

Article

Effects of Imprinting

July 01, 2003

Results of Texas A&M University's research into imprinting's effects on six-month-old foals conclude that neither the frequency of imprinting sessions nor their timing after birth influenced foals' later behavior. Some veterinarians disagree... Read More

Article

Limb Deformities: Congenital or Acquired?

July 01, 2003

As the foal takes his initial stance, a proud owner takes stock to see how straight and strong the youngster's legs are. Many foals are born with seemingly crooked legs (congenital). Most of these crooked legs straighten by the time the foal is ... Read More

Article

Life Without Mom

July 01, 2003

One of the most traumatic times in a young horse's life is when he is separated from his mother at weaning time. From birth, he has been dependent on the mare for sustenance and protection. At weaning time that changes, and the youngster must... Read More

Article

Conservative Therapy for Crooked Foals

April 01, 2003

The most common angular limb deformity in foals is carpus valgus (sometimes called toeing out) in which affected foals have limbs that flare outward below the carpus (knee). This deformity can be corrected surgically with hemi-circumferential... Read More

Article

Botulism in Foals: A Survivable Disease

March 01, 2003

Botulism in foals less than six months of age is readily treated, with a survival rate of more than 95% in appropriately treated foals. Treatment can include nursing care, intravenous fluid support, nasogastric or nasoesophageal tube feeding... Read More

Article

AAEP 2002: Botulism in Foals: A Survivable Disease

February 13, 2003

Historically, botulism has usually been seen as a fatal problem for the young foal. However, Pamela Wilkins, DVM, PhD, of the Graham French Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the University of Pennsylvania’s New Bolton Center, said that she ha... Read More

Article

Failure of Serologic Tests to Detect Rhodococcus equi Foal Pneumonia

February 13, 2003

In the past, some veterinarians have relied on commercially available serologic tests to establish, confirm, or rule out a diagnosis of foal pneumonia caused by the soil-borne bacteria Rhodococcus equi.... Read More

Article

Diagnosis and Treatment of Rhabdomyolysis in Foals

February 13, 2003

We hear a lot about a horse experiencing rhabdomyolysis (tying-up) during or after exercise. However, foals are also susceptible to muscle damage. Stephanie Valberg, DVM, PhD, of the University of Minnesota, presented "A Review of the Diagnosis... Read More

Article

AAEP 2002: Reproduction

February 04, 2003

The reproduction session at the annual AAEP meeting in Orlando, Fla., was something of an A to Z seminar with an international flavor. It started with speakers from North America presenting discussions on endometrial echotexture (ultrasound... Read More