Tevis 2011: Snow Forces Changes to Ride Route

Tevis 2011: Snow Forces Changes to Ride Route

The Tevis ride was rerouted after parts of the trail received six to 10 inches of snow.

Photo: Western States Trail Foundation

Less than two days before the official start of the 2011 Tevis 100-mile endurance ride, Mother Nature dropped six to 10 inches of snow on Robie Park, the ride's official start point in California's High Sierra Mountains.

Lark’s tail

The Tevis ride was rerouted after parts of the trail received six to 10 inches of snow.

With reconnaissance photos showing deep, wet snow at both the starting point and at the mile 36 vetting station, the Tevis Board of Governors made the decision to drastically reroute the Tevis track. The ride will start at the traditional finish line and run a 100-mile loop into the lower Sierra Mountains.

Eight hundred volunteers were involved in carrying out the reroute as they redirected supplies and veterinarians to new checkpoints and communicated with the nearly 200 participating riders and hundreds of crew members.

New checkpoints and the equine heart rates required at each vet check have been posted to help riders pace their horses. After crossing the finish line, a horse's heart rate must fall to 68 beats per minute within 30 minutes of completion, and the horse must trot up sound for an official veterinarian before completion is certified.

The weather forecast for the lower elevations of the Oct. 8 ride include 70° F (21° C) high temperatures and sun.

As a result of the cooler-than-normal temperatures for Tevis, Greg Fellers, DVM, veteran head veterinarian at the event, has predicted some of the fastest finish times in ride history.

About the Author

Marsha Hayes

Marsha Hayes has been covering endurance, trail, and other equine topics since 2005. She believes every horse has a story.

Stay on top of the most recent Horse Health news with FREE weekly newsletters from TheHorse.com. Learn More

Free Newsletters

Sign up for the latest in:

From our partners