Colorado Vesicular Stomatitis Quarantines Released

Colorado Vesicular Stomatitis Quarantines Released

Vesicular stomatitis causes blisters to form in the animal's mouth, on teats, or along the hooves, resulting in excessive salivation, lameness, or oozing sores.

Photo: Brian McCluskey

The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) released the second of two quarantines that were imposed on premises for horses that were affected with vesicular stomatitis (VS).

"We are pleased to have released these quarantines," said State Veterinarian Keith Roehr, DVM. "We're fortunate in that we only had two confirmed cases this summer. The occurrence of VS was expected to have been more widespread, diseases that are primarily insect borne are difficult to predict."

It is still important to consult with the state animal health officials in the state of destination concerning import requirements or VS statements that might need to be included on certificates of veterinary inspection.

The State Veterinarian's office continues its travel requirement for horses, mules, cattle, bison, sheep, goats, swine, and camelids entering the state from states with confirmed cases of VS. This requirement states that health certificates should include the following statement from the issuing veterinarian, "I have examined the animal(s) represented on this Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) and have found no signs of vesicular stomatitis and they have not originated from a premises under quarantine for vesicular stomatitis."

A viral, foreign animal disease that occurs sporadically in the United States, VS usually appears in southwestern states. The disease, thought to be transmitted by sand flies and black flies, can affect horses, cattle, and swine and occasionally sheep, goats, and deer. It causes blisters to form in the animal's mouth, on teats, or along the hooves, resulting in excessive salivation, lameness, or oozing sores.

VS can incubate for two to eight days before clinical signs appear. It is rarely fatal and usually lasts about two weeks before clearing up. Prior to this year, the last confirmed case of VS in Colorado was diagnosed in 2006.

Stay on top of the most recent Horse Health news with FREE weekly newsletters from TheHorse.com. Learn More

Free Newsletters

Sign up for the latest in:

From our partners