Musculoskeletal System

Article

On the Forehand

March 01, 2006

The foreleg of the horse is, for the most part, a model of good engineering. It is structured in such a fashion that the horse can move slowly or at speed with the concussion of each footfall minimized by a sophisticated shock absorbing system.... Read More

Article

Musculoskeletal Disease Biomarkers

March 01, 2006

Colorado State University (CSU) researchers have found significant patterns of six different signals of damage or "biomarkers" in the serum of racehorses with certain musculoskeletal diseases.

Biomarkers are indicators of abnormal... Read More

Article

Laminitis (AAEP Convention 2005)

February 17, 2006

What causes laminitis? Is it the same as founder? Should I remove shoes from a horse with acute laminitis? Should I soak his feet? Does laminitis always have devastating consequences?... Read More

Article

Synovial Joints and How They Work

February 01, 2006

First we'll look at how the horse's synovial joints are constructed, then we'll outline where they are located, the functions they serve, and some of the problems that can develop.... Read More

Article

Hoof Trimming and Leg Stress: One Step at a Time

January 01, 2006

As a rule of thumb, we know that our horses should be trimmed (and shod if necessary) at least every six to eight weeks. But where did those numbers come from? Van Heel recently studied how a hoof changes between trims, and she found that neglecting ... Read More

Article

Progress in Predicting Joint Problems

December 22, 2005

Someday veterinarians might be able to take a horse's blood sample, analyze its makeup to predict his future bone and joint health, and simply prevent the problems that are likely to arise. In late 2005, 20 leading joint researchers that are likely ... Read More

Article

Chronic Joint Diseases (Book Excerpt)

December 14, 2005

Horses with chronic musculoskeletal disorders may benefit from periodic administration of analgesic medications such as NSAIDs to help control pain when it is at its worst.... Read More

Article

Joint Injury Prevention in Foals

November 29, 2005

Developmental and traumatic joint injuries are a significant problem in Thoroughbred foals. These injuries, such as osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) and fetlock joint lesions, often require costly medical treatment or surgical repair.... Read More

Article

Tweaking Tails

October 01, 2005

There is bucolic tranquility in the sight of two horses dozing in the sun, side by side, nose to tail, with their tails rhythmically swishing as they leisurely work at keeping flies off their bodies. That is the basic purpose of the equine tail... Read More

Article

Joint Cartilage Adaptation in Young Horses

April 22, 2005

It is widely believed that exercise and limb-loading in foals help joint cartilage functionally adapt to the rigors of athletic activity. In 2005, Dutch researchers set out to find out if they could verify the concept of functional adaptation of... Read More

Article

Distal Phalanx Angles and DDFT Lesions? (AAEP 2004)

February 14, 2005

Dyson and her colleagues discovered in a recent study that there were no significant differences in the angles of the distal phalanx (P3, or the coffin bone) between horses of mixed breeds, with and without DDFT injury. However, they found that when ... Read More

Article

Sacroiliac Joint Pain

February 13, 2005

There were a couple of take-home messages from Dyson's presentation. One was that sacroiliac joint problems can dramatically compromise a horse's ability to perform, and the other was that using an analgesic injection can be a valuable technique in ... Read More

Article

Basic Horse Anatomy and Physiology

January 01, 2005

Gain an understanding of how the horse is constructed and what this means in the realm of form to function.... Read More

Article

With Every Fiber of Their Being

December 01, 2004

With the recent Athens Olympics as our inspiration, we might all be pondering what it takes to go "faster, higher, and stronger." Whether you're a human, a hamster, or a horse, the answer, at least in part, is muscle fibers--each of which holds... Read More

Article

Septic Arthritis

November 10, 2004

Septic arthritis in a Thoroughbred foal significantly reduces the likelihood the animal will race, according to a study conducted by researchers at the University of Glasgow in Scotland and... Read More

Article

Managing Skeletal Pain

October 21, 2004

"Management of severe skeletal pain in the horse can be a challenging task in practice, and is complicated by the fact that many drugs used for this purpose are controlled substances," said Jessica Kidd, BA, DVM, CertES(Orth), DipECVS, MRCVS, of... Read More

Article

Treating Navicular Disease From Inside the Bone

July 01, 2004

Healthy bone undergoes constant metabolic change to prevent bone loss or abnormal remodeling (cell turnover) that can occur with loading. Horses with navicular disease can have abnormal remodeling and formation of osteolytic lesions (areas of... Read More

Article

Problems in the Hip and Pelvis

July 01, 2004

When you think about equine lameness, you probably think first about the bones, muscles, tendons, and ligaments of the leg, and of course the hoof. But lameness can also stem from trouble higher up the skeleton, including the pelvic (or... Read More

Article

Beasts of Burden

June 01, 2004

Any horse owner who tours the medieval gallery at a museum must stop at the displays of suits of armor and marvel. Imagine the sheer weight of such an outfit--then imagine trying to maneuver oneself into the saddle wearing it! Visions of... Read More

Article

Foot Care for Foals

June 01, 2004

A foal's future performance in competition, or as a pleasure riding companion, depends in large part on how his feet are cared for in the first six months of his life. ... Read More

Article

Identifying Sacroiliac Joint Pain

May 01, 2004

A diagnosis of sacroiliac joint (SI) pain tends to be one of exclusion, after other causes of hind limb lameness have been ruled out. To simplify the diagnostic process, researchers in the United Kingdom conducted a study involving 74 horses... Read More

Compression of the spinal cord, whether because of misaligned or malformed vertebrae or some other problem, causes the distinctive "wobble" of wobbler syndrome. This compression injures or kills the nerves that are responsible for sensing the position of the limbs. This, of course, leads to the lack of awareness that causes clumsiness and incoordination.

Article

What's Wobbler Syndrome?

April 01, 2004

Wobbler, also known as wobbles, takes its name from its primary sign--a wobbling or uncoordinated gait. ... Read More

Article

Foal Care From Birth to 30 Days (AAEP 2003)

January 31, 2004

Foal care from the first few hours of life to one month can be critical in the overall health and welfare of the newborn foal.... Read More

Article

Glass Horse Model Expanded

January 07, 2004

The popular three-dimensional electronic horse model, "The Glass Horse CD," which offered a novel look at the gastrointestinal anatomy of the horse when it was introduced in November of 2001, has a new companion that depicts the structures of th... Read More

Article

Steroid Effects on the Knees

October 01, 2003

During intensive training, young racehorses experience a thickening in the layers of bone under the cartilage of joints. These layers, called subchondral (located nearer the surface) and cancellous, become harder and better able to handle the... Read More