Horse Health Glossary

Not sure what that veterinary word means? Look it up below!

Reprinted with permission from the University of California, Davis, The Book of Horses edited by Mordecai Siegal.

ULCER, ULCERATION:
A severe sloughing of the surface of an organ or tissue, as a result of a toxic or inflammatory response at the site.
ULCERATIVE KERATITIS:
Inflammation of the cornea accompanied by corneal ulceration.
ULCERATIVE LYMPHANGITIS:
Uncommon condition affecting the lymphatic vessels; can be caused by either Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis or Sporothrix schenckii, usually as the result of wound contamination. The lesions appear as nodules that develop most often on the hind legs below the hocks. The nodules eventually break down and ulcerate, releasing a thick greenish pus mixed with blood.
ULTRASONOGRAPHY:
Noninvasive diagnostic technique for visualizing the internal structures of the body by means of sound (echo) reflections; ultrasound.
ULTRASOUND:
Ultrasonography.
ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION:
High-energy radiation existing beyond the violet region of the electromagnetic spectrum; ultraviolet rays emitted by the sun are responsible for a number of effects on the skin, including tanning, burning, and activation of vitamin D.
UMBILICAL CORD:
Blood-vessel connection between the mare and the fetus.
UNICELLULAR:
Single-celled.
UNILATERAL:
Occurring on only one side.
UNILATERAL PAPULAR DERMATOSIS:
Poorly understood skin disease of Quarter Horses.
UNSOUNDNESS:
Any deviation in structure or function that interferes with a horse's intended use or performance.
UNTHRIFTY:
Unkempt in appearance and failing to thrive.
URACHUS:
Structure that during fetal life transports the foal's urine into the placental fluids; it normally closes off after birth.
UREA:
Nitrogen-containing compound generated by the breakdown of ingested proteins.
UREMIA:
Abnormally elevated levels of urea and other nitrogenous waste products in the blood.
URETER:
Membranous tube that transports urine from the kidney to the urinary bladder.
URETEROLITH:
Urinary stone lodged in the ureter.
URETHRA:
Membranous tube that transports urine from the urinary bladder to the exterior of the body.
URETHRAL DIVERTICULAR CONCRETION:
The accumulation of smegma into a solidified mass in the urethra, resulting in inflammation and obstruction; also called bean.
URETHRITIS:
Inflammation of the urethra.
URETHROLITH:
Urinary stone lodged in the urethra.
URINALYSIS (UA):
Panel of physicochemical tests carried out on urine, as an aid in the diagnosis of urinary-tract disorders.
URINARY CALCULUS (PLURAL: CALCULI):
General term for a stone lodged anywhere within the urinary tract; also known as a urolith.
URINE:
The fluid filtrate of the kidneys.
URINE SEDIMENT:
Urine solids obtained by centrifuging a urine sample.
UROLITH:
General term for a urinary stone.
UROLITHIASIS:
The formation of urinary stones; uncommon in horses.
UROPERITONEUM:
Accumulation of urine in the abdominal cavity.
UROSPERMIA:
Urination during ejaculation.
UROVAGINA:
Urine "pooling" in the vagina; also called vesicovaginal reflux.
URTICARIA ("HIVES"):
Acute, usually localized skin swelling caused by an increased permeability of capillaries, producing a net outflow of fluid into the tissue spaces; often a manifestation of an allergic process.
UTERINE HORNS:
Paired branchings of the uterus leading from the body of the uterus to the uterine tubes.
UTERINE INVERSION:
Protrusion of a portion of the uterus through the cervix; uterine prolapse.
UTERINE PROLAPSE:
Uterine inversion.
UTERINE TORSION:
Twisting of the uterus, which may occur late in pregnancy when the uterus is very enlarged.
UTERINE TUBES:
Paired fallopian tubes of the uterus wherein fertilization of the eggs with sperm occurs; also called oviducts.
UTERUS:
Organ in the female wherein the fertilized egg implants and develops through embryonic and fetal stages until birth; womb.
UVEA:
Cellular layer of the eye that contains blood vessels, the iris, ciliary body, and choroid.
UVEITIS:
Inflammation of the uvea of the eye.

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