Sarah Evers Conrad

A lifelong horse person, Sarah Evers Conrad has a BA in Journalism and Equine Science from Western Kentucky University. She was on the staff of The Horse for almost five years, and then became Managing Editor of Equestrian magazine, the official publication of the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF). She was then promoted to Director of E-Communications at USEF. She now works as Content Manager for All Inclusive Outlet, a travel agency that specializes in all inclusive vacations to the Caribbean, Mexico, Costa Rica, and Panama. In her free time she enjoys spending time with her husband and son, traveling, reading, photography, crocheting, and spending time outdoors.

Articles by Sarah Evers Conrad

Would You Drink It?

Have you ever taken a really good look at all of your horse's water sources, whether he is drinking from a large tank, pond, or automatic waterer? Have you asked yourself, "Would I drink this water? Do I really expect my horse to drink it?" If Read More

African Horse Sickness Cases Lessen

The African horse sickness (AHS) death toll in the Western Cape of South Africa has risen to 15 confirmed cases since the first death on the Elsenburg Agricultural Research Farm was confirmed on Feb. 25. The last case (unconfirmed) was reported Read More

African Horse Sickness Cases Lessen in Western Cape

The African horse sickness (AHS) death toll in the Western Cape of South Africa has risen to 15 confirmed cases since the first death on the Elsenburg Agricultural Research Farm was confirmed on Feb. 25. Two cases are awaiting confirmation, with Read More

Feeding HYPP Horses

Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) horses need careful dietary management to reduce attacks. Read More

Deadly African Horse Sickness Outbreak

Thirteen horses in the Western Cape, South Africa, are believed to have succumbed to an outbreak of African horse sickness (AHS) by March 22, according to several news reports. The affected horses were from the Stellenbosch magesterial district Read More

African Horse Sickness Continues in South Africa

Nine horses have succumbed to African horse sickness (AHS) in the Western Cape, South Africa, according to www.iol.com. The last horse was reported dead on March 12 by the South African news source Read More

Nutritional Series Kicks Off in Lexington, Ky.

In the first of a new series of nutritional talks sponsored by Buckeye Nutrition, 30 veterinarians from Lexington, Ky., and surrounding areas attended a dinner and a presentation on Feb. 11. Kent Thompson, PhD, Buckeye Nutrition's Director of Read More

Western Performance Horse Injuries and Problems

Tarsitis (hock inflammation) is a common problem for Western performance horses since they use their hind ends heavily during events such as reining and cutting. Black believes that a large percentage of high-performance Western performance horses Read More

Deadly African Horse Sickness Outbreak in Africa

Six horses in the Western Cape, Africa, succumbed to an outbreak of African horse sickness (AHS) during the week of Feb. 23, according to several news reports. The affected horses were from the Stellenbosch area, reported Read More

AAEP Wrap-Up: Surgery

Surgery for DDSP


Dorsal displacement of the soft palate (DDSP) occurs when the palate partially obstructs the airway by becoming displaced on top of the epiglottis. This can affect breathing, especially Read More

Gastrointestinal Rupture Clinical Signs (AAEP 2003)

Results of the study could help veterinarians know what signs to look for to make a definitive diagnosis of intestinal rupture, thus allowing them to prevent prolonged suffering of the affected horse and additional expense to the horse owner, as euth Read More

Promising New Treatment for Equine Sarcoids (AAEP 2003)

One of the most common and effective treatments for sarcoids is chemotherapy using the drug cisplatin, which is noted for its ease of use, low cost, and high efficacy (up to 90% for sarcoids and 70-90% for carcinomas). Read More

Return to Racing for Roarers After Surgery

Results of a study from the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center suggest that there is a high chance that a horse can return to racing after surgery for laryngeal hemiplegia (partial or complete paralysis of the larynx, also called roaring) Read More

Cribbing: Effect on Colic (AAEP 2003)

Cribbing, the oral stereotypic behavior in which the horse grabs an object with his teeth while flexing his neck and sometimes swallowing air, has long been suspected as a cause of colic. Read More

Cribbing and Colic

Cribbing, the oral stereotypic behavior in which the horse grabs an object with his teeth while flexing his neck and sometimes swallowing air, has long been suspected as a cause of colic. A study from the Universities of Illinois and Liverpool Read More

Dystocia Management

Incidence of dystocia is around 4%, although this varies by breed, Embertson said. While many dystocias are resolved on the farm, some cases need to be referred to a hospital. This decision should be made based on the position of the foal, duration Read More

Jump-Starting the Dummy Foal

The term "dummy foal" is being used less and less. A more accurate term for the foal exhibiting behavioral or neurologic abnormalities that are not related to infectious or toxic conditions, congenital or developmental abnormalities, or metabolic dis Read More

Abdominal Pain in Foals (AAEP 2003)

Abdominal pain in the foal can have many different causes, making it difficult to diagnose a cause. However, with knowledge of the different causes, a proper physical exam, the use of diagnostic tools, and common sense, a veterinarian can pinpoint a Read More

When a Foal Needs Surgery (AAEP 2003)

If your new foal develops a disease or medical problem that requires surgery, then time is of the essence. In his AAEP Convention presentation "Surgical Disease of the Neonate," Rolf Embertson, DVM, Dipl. ACVS, of Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital Read More

The Equine Stomach (AAEP 2003: Milne Lecture)

Merritt's presentation highlighted advances made over the last 40 years in the understanding of how the equine stomach functions and its related diseases. His presentation had a special emphasis on equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS), and slides of Read More

Alleviating Acute and Chronic Hind Limb Pain

Musculoskeletal pain associated with acute and chronic hind limb injuries is common in equine practice. Unabated pain can result in complications such as gastrointestinal disorders and supporting limb laminitis. Pain management is critical to decreas Read More

Alternative Site for Collecting Blood

The jugular vein is the most common place to draw blood from a horse; however, this is not always possible. If the jugular vein is damaged or if the horse is no longer tolerant of the procedure, there is an alternative location to draw blood, Read More

Managing a Rabid Horse

Is it colic, or could it be rabies? The horse with rabies is extremely dangerous to himself, other animals, and humans. Rabies is a fatal viral disease of mammals that can be spread to humans through bites, licks, or through contact with the victim's Read More

Surgery for Dorsal Displacement of the Soft Palate

Dorsal displacement of the soft palate (DDSP) occurs when the palate partially obstructs the airway by becoming displaced on top of the epiglottis. This obstruction can affect breathing, especially during intense exercise. Read More

Breeding The High-Risk Mare

With advances in modern veterinary medicine happening all of the time, the practitioners agreed that management of high-risk mares is becoming easier, and the probability of a healthy foal is increasing. Read More