Katherine Walcott

Katherine Walcott is a freelance writer living in the countryside near Birmingham, Al. She writes for anyone she can talk into paying her and rides whatever disciplines she can talk her horses into doing.

Articles by Katherine Walcott

Eliminating Ammonia

The products available to control ammonia buildup in barns boast a variety of forms and ingredients. Read More

Eradicating Pasture Erosion

Fixing pre-existing pasture erosion will probably entail a visit by a county extension agent or a pasture management consultant. Options would be to reduce the number of horses, lime and fertilize, or, in cases of major deterioration, to start over. Read More

Safe and Healthful Stall Mats

So you have decided to invest in rubber mats for your stalls. What now? In this article, we'll compare some of the available features, and we'll give you points to consider when refining the requirements for your barn.

An important Read More

Buying Better Hay -- Stacks of Decisions

The quality of hay is important to maintaining proper digestion. Quality hay contains nothing harmful (dust, mold, weeds, or foreign objects), provides the necessary nutrients for the horse consuming it, and is palatable. Read More

Feeding Horses With Laminitis

What do you feed a horse with laminitis? Nothing, plus a bit of hay is a common diet. Does it work? Yes, and no. Expert opinions and modern research are showing that, in some cases, nothing might be the wrong answer when it comes to feedstuffs, Read More

Making Cross Country Jumps Safer

A company in the United Kingdom has created a jump design to lessen the severity of cross-country jumping falls. In 1999, several U.K. riders died from accidents on cross-country jumps. The resultant British Horse Trials Association study Read More

Frangible Pins: Making Cross Country Jumps Safer

A company in the United Kingdom has created a jump design to lessen the severity of cross-country falls. In 1999, several U.K. riders died from accidents on cross-country jumps. The resultant study committee hired the Transport Research Read More

Mosquito Patrol

Mosquitoes are more than a nuisance, they are a public and equine health hazard. In addition to spreading West Nile virus (WNV), mosquitoes can carry malaria, yellow fever, dengue, filariasus (e.g., dog heartworm), and several encephalitis Read More

Airing Out Your Barn

Many agree that older barns are gorgeous, but are they good for horses? There are many issues to consider, such as construction, footing, layout, and safety. One of the biggest issues is ventilation--is your horse getting enough air? Read More

Posting The Guard

With more land owners deciding to use their acres to house a horse or pony comes the inevitable question, "Which fence should I use?" Because you are trying to contain living creatures who are nomadic by nature, and accident prone by design, you Read More

Common Barn Injuries

Two of the saddest words in the English language. After an accident, we tear ourselves apart thinking how we could have prevented it. If only I had seen...If only I had done...Yet, as horse people, we are surrounded by thousands of pounds of Read More

Wildlife Disease: Contagious Critters

Diseases from other animals pose a constant threat to our horses. Disease-causing agents, or pathogens, lurk in local wildlife, fly overhead in birds, and lay in the next field inside cows peacefully chewing their cuds. These disease agents--whether Read More

Girth Strap Tightness

Every time you saddle a horse, you tighten a girth. But how tight should you make that girth? Just enough to keep the saddle on? With space to slip a hand under the girth? As tight as it will go? Furthermore, how well does a horse breathe with this Read More

Prepurchase Exams: What Can They Tell You?

A prepurchase exam is not a guarantee of future soundness. A veterinarian can tell you if a horse is sound at that moment, point out evidence of past problems, and show you areas that have the potential to cause problems in the future. Read More

Fireproofing Older Barns

"Fire is living and breathing. It has its own life," says Amy Tryon. "It is sort of like horses. Once you think you've got it all figured out, something will come along and show you that you don't." However, Tryon knows more than most about both Read More