Kim A. Sprayberry, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM

Dr. Kim A. Sprayberry, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM, is an internal medicine specialist at Hagyard Equine Medical Institute in Lexington, Ky. When not working with horses, she enjoys pursuits in medical journalism and editing as well as kayaking and American southwest archaeology.

Articles by Kim Sprayberry, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM

Is She Ready to Foal Yet?

How do I know if my mare is getting close to her delivery date?
A: This can vary a great deal from mare to Read More

Botulism: A Perfect Killer


Horses are highly susceptible to botulism toxins; vaccination and feed/water management are key to prevention.

Botulism is an often-lethal disease caused by a bacterial toxin. Although Read More

EPM Today: Testing and Treatments

Horses need to be serviceably sound and safe to ride to fulfill their functions. It is no wonder that equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) has been a dreaded disease ever since its rise to prominence in the 1990s, because horses with neurologic Read More

Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

We keep them in our barns, give them to our animals, and take them ourselves. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are common, but they aren't benign. In this article we'll investigate what NSAIDs are and aren't, and what we should know Read More

Rhodococcus equi

From the moment a newborn foal exits the warm fluid environment of its gestation and draws a first postpartum breath of air, it is exposed to millions of would-be invaders that would do it harm if not for the components of the foal's immune system, Read More

Lyme Disease Update

The clinical signs that are typically attributed to Lyme disease (so named because early investigations centered around clusters of the disease in humans around Lyme, Conn.) include fever, stiffness and lameness in multiple limbs, painful muscles Read More

Leptospirosis Starting to Get More Attention

Recurrent painful inflammation and pathologic changes in the eyes of horses with equine recurrent uveitis (ERU, also known as moon blindness) could be caused by the persistence of invasive bacteria called Leptospira in affected horses' eyes Read More

New Perspectives on the Pain Drain

Most veterinarians stock the drawers in their mobile units so that the easiest containers to reach when they open the drug compartments are the pain medications. Whether the situation is an emergency call to tend a horse that has acute abdominal Read More