The American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) presented Douglas Corey, DVM, with the Distinguished Life Member Award for his long-time dedication to the association and efforts to preserve the welfare of horses. Corey, who served as AAEP president in 2007, will be honored during the Nov. 21 President's Luncheon at the 2011 Annual Convention in San Antonio, Texas.

Since joining the AAEP in 1976, Corey has assumed the role of a trusted and loyal advocate for the association, taking a special interest in issues affecting the welfare of horses. Corey's numerous leadership positions within the AAEP include serving as chairman of the Research, Public Relations, Membership, Equine Welfare and 50th Anniversary committees. He was elected to serve as a member of the AAEP's board of directors from 1995 to 1998.

Corey has practiced at Associated Veterinary Clinic, a mixed animal practice in Walla Walla, Wash., for the past 30 years. He currently serves as the chairman of the Unwanted Horse Coalition and is a member of the American Horse Council's Animal Welfare Committee. He is noted for his efforts working with the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association developing minimum care guidelines for rodeo livestock. He is a long-time member of the PRCA's Animal Welfare Committee and an On Call media spokesperson for the National Rodeo Finals.

In addition, Corey is a past president and board member of the Oregon Veterinary Medical Association and was honored as the 1997 Oregon Veterinarian of the Year. He has served as the chairman of the American Veterinary Medical Association's Animal Welfare Committee and is a member of the American Horse Council's Equine Welfare Committee.

A graduate of Whitman College in Walla Walla, Corey received his veterinary degree from Colorado State University in 1976. He and his wife, Heather, have a daughter, Cydney, and a son, Bobby.

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